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Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass : pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance

Marco Ranucci, Giovanni Carboni, Mauro Cotza and Filip De Somer UGent (2017) PERFUSION-UK. 32(1). p.4-12
abstract
Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
cardiopulmonary bypass, carbon dioxide, capnography, blood lactates, oxygen delivery, ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY, VENOUS OXYGEN-SATURATION, BLOOD LACTATE LEVELS, OPEN-HEART-SURGERY, ANAEROBIC METABOLISM, PCO2 DIFFERENCE, CARDIAC-SURGERY, CO2 PRODUCTION, LACTIC-ACID, ARTERIAL
journal title
PERFUSION-UK
Perfusion-UK
volume
32
issue
1
pages
4 - 12
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000391573600002
ISSN
0267-6591
DOI
10.1177/0267659116659919
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8509661
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8509661
date created
2017-02-15 14:45:48
date last changed
2017-05-08 14:54:24
@article{8509661,
  abstract     = {Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.},
  author       = {Ranucci, Marco and Carboni, Giovanni and Cotza, Mauro and De Somer, Filip},
  issn         = {0267-6591},
  journal      = {PERFUSION-UK},
  keyword      = {cardiopulmonary bypass,carbon dioxide,capnography,blood lactates,oxygen delivery,ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY,VENOUS OXYGEN-SATURATION,BLOOD LACTATE LEVELS,OPEN-HEART-SURGERY,ANAEROBIC METABOLISM,PCO2 DIFFERENCE,CARDIAC-SURGERY,CO2 PRODUCTION,LACTIC-ACID,ARTERIAL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {4--12},
  title        = {Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass : pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659116659919},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Ranucci, Marco, Giovanni Carboni, Mauro Cotza, and Filip De Somer. 2017. “Carbon Dioxide Production During Cardiopulmonary Bypass : Pathophysiology, Measure and Clinical Relevance.” Perfusion-uk 32 (1): 4–12.
APA
Ranucci, M., Carboni, G., Cotza, M., & De Somer, F. (2017). Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass : pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance. PERFUSION-UK, 32(1), 4–12.
Vancouver
1.
Ranucci M, Carboni G, Cotza M, De Somer F. Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass : pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance. PERFUSION-UK. 2017;32(1):4–12.
MLA
Ranucci, Marco, Giovanni Carboni, Mauro Cotza, et al. “Carbon Dioxide Production During Cardiopulmonary Bypass : Pathophysiology, Measure and Clinical Relevance.” PERFUSION-UK 32.1 (2017): 4–12. Print.