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Transcriptome profiling of the green alga Spirogyra pratensis (Charophyta) suggests an ancestral role for ethylene in cell wall metabolism, photosynthesis, and abiotic stress responses

Bram Van de Poel, Endymion D Cooper, Dominique Van Der Straeten UGent, Caren Chang and Charles F Delwiche (2016) PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 172(1). p.533-545
abstract
It is well known that ethylene regulates a diverse set of developmental and stress-related processes in angiosperms, yet its roles in early-diverging embryophytes and algae are poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that ethylene functions as a hormone in the charophyte green alga Spirogyra pratensis. Since land plants evolved from charophytes, this implies conservation of ethylene as a hormone in green plants for at least 450 million years. However, the physiological role of ethylene in charophyte algae has remained unknown. To gain insight into ethylene responses in Spirogyra, we used mRNA sequencing to measure changes in gene expression over time in Spirogyra filaments in response to an ethylene treatment. Our analyses show that at the transcriptional level, ethylene predominantly regulates three processes in Spirogyra: (1) modification of the cell wall matrix by expansins and xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases, (2) down-regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis, and (3) activation of abiotic stress responses. We confirmed that the photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content were reduced by an ethylene treatment and that several abiotic stress conditions could stimulate cell elongation in an ethylene-dependent manner. We also found that the Spirogyra transcriptome harbors only 10 ethylene-responsive transcription factor (ERF) homologs, several of which are regulated by ethylene. These results provide an initial understanding of the hormonal responses induced by ethylene in Spirogyra and help to reconstruct the role of ethylene in ancestral charophytes prior to the origin of land plants.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DEEP-WATER RICE, ROOT HAIR INITIATION, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, POTAMOGETON-PECTINATUS, EVOLUTIONARY ORIGIN, SEMIAQUATIC FERN, PLANT HORMONE, LAND PLANTS, GROWTH, EXPANSINS
journal title
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Plant Physiol.
volume
172
issue
1
pages
533 - 545
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000388451900040
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
6.456 (2016)
JCR rank
11/211 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.16.00299
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
8507710
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8507710
date created
2017-02-06 11:01:26
date last changed
2017-02-24 13:01:13
@article{8507710,
  abstract     = {It is well known that ethylene regulates a diverse set of developmental and stress-related processes in angiosperms, yet its roles in early-diverging embryophytes and algae are poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that ethylene functions as a hormone in the charophyte green alga Spirogyra pratensis. Since land plants evolved from charophytes, this implies conservation of ethylene as a hormone in green plants for at least 450 million years. However, the physiological role of ethylene in charophyte algae has remained unknown. To gain insight into ethylene responses in Spirogyra, we used mRNA sequencing to measure changes in gene expression over time in Spirogyra filaments in response to an ethylene treatment. Our analyses show that at the transcriptional level, ethylene predominantly regulates three processes in Spirogyra: (1) modification of the cell wall matrix by expansins and xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases, (2) down-regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis, and (3) activation of abiotic stress responses. We confirmed that the photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content were reduced by an ethylene treatment and that several abiotic stress conditions could stimulate cell elongation in an ethylene-dependent manner. We also found that the Spirogyra transcriptome harbors only 10 ethylene-responsive transcription factor (ERF) homologs, several of which are regulated by ethylene. These results provide an initial understanding of the hormonal responses induced by ethylene in Spirogyra and help to reconstruct the role of ethylene in ancestral charophytes prior to the origin of land plants.},
  author       = {Van de Poel, Bram and Cooper, Endymion D and Van Der Straeten, Dominique and Chang, Caren and Delwiche, Charles F},
  issn         = {0032-0889},
  journal      = {PLANT PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {DEEP-WATER RICE,ROOT HAIR INITIATION,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,POTAMOGETON-PECTINATUS,EVOLUTIONARY ORIGIN,SEMIAQUATIC FERN,PLANT HORMONE,LAND PLANTS,GROWTH,EXPANSINS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {533--545},
  title        = {Transcriptome profiling of the green alga Spirogyra pratensis (Charophyta) suggests an ancestral role for ethylene in cell wall metabolism, photosynthesis, and abiotic stress responses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.16.00299},
  volume       = {172},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Van de Poel, Bram, Endymion D Cooper, Dominique Van Der Straeten, Caren Chang, and Charles F Delwiche. 2016. “Transcriptome Profiling of the Green Alga Spirogyra Pratensis (Charophyta) Suggests an Ancestral Role for Ethylene in Cell Wall Metabolism, Photosynthesis, and Abiotic Stress Responses.” Plant Physiology 172 (1): 533–545.
APA
Van de Poel, B., Cooper, E. D., Van Der Straeten, D., Chang, C., & Delwiche, C. F. (2016). Transcriptome profiling of the green alga Spirogyra pratensis (Charophyta) suggests an ancestral role for ethylene in cell wall metabolism, photosynthesis, and abiotic stress responses. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, 172(1), 533–545.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Poel B, Cooper ED, Van Der Straeten D, Chang C, Delwiche CF. Transcriptome profiling of the green alga Spirogyra pratensis (Charophyta) suggests an ancestral role for ethylene in cell wall metabolism, photosynthesis, and abiotic stress responses. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 2016;172(1):533–45.
MLA
Van de Poel, Bram, Endymion D Cooper, Dominique Van Der Straeten, et al. “Transcriptome Profiling of the Green Alga Spirogyra Pratensis (Charophyta) Suggests an Ancestral Role for Ethylene in Cell Wall Metabolism, Photosynthesis, and Abiotic Stress Responses.” PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 172.1 (2016): 533–545. Print.