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How to react - Moral Reflections of an Audience to Messages of Distant Suffering

Eline Huiberts (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The current study interrogates reactions of an audience in a continuously globalizing society. Ideas of cosmopolitan citizenship and global moral responsibility have gained significance in the academic debate (cf. Chouliaraki, 2006; Linklater, 2007). In particular, it has been suggested that media representations that are embedded in a cosmopolitan discourse can encourage an increasingly global moral horizon in audiences and encourage solidarity towards distant suffering (Chouliaraki, 2006; Kyriakidou 2014; Linklater, 2007). It is this line of argumentation that is further explored in our study. The study is based on six focus groups (total of 27 participants) during which people were shown a news item of the Dutch national news broadcaster on the humanitarian situation during the 2011 Horn of Africa crisis. In the subsequent group discussions, particular attention was paid to people's reflection about their own moral responsibility towards the distant suffering.
Keywords
Audience Studies, Distant Suffering, Focus Groups, Globalization, Cosmopolitanism, Moral Psychology

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Huiberts, Eline. 2016. “How to React - Moral Reflections of an Audience to Messages of Distant Suffering.” In ICA’s 66th Annual Conference - Communicating with Power.
APA
Huiberts, E. (2016). How to react - Moral Reflections of an Audience to Messages of Distant Suffering. ICA’s 66th Annual Conference - Communicating with Power. Presented at the ICA’s 66th Annual Conference - Communicating with Power.
Vancouver
1.
Huiberts E. How to react - Moral Reflections of an Audience to Messages of Distant Suffering. ICA’s 66th Annual Conference - Communicating with Power. 2016.
MLA
Huiberts, Eline. “How to React - Moral Reflections of an Audience to Messages of Distant Suffering.” ICA’s 66th Annual Conference - Communicating with Power. 2016. Print.
@inproceedings{8507450,
  abstract     = {The current study interrogates reactions of an audience in a continuously globalizing society. Ideas of cosmopolitan citizenship and global moral responsibility have gained significance in the academic debate (cf. Chouliaraki, 2006; Linklater, 2007). In particular, it has been suggested that media representations that are embedded in a cosmopolitan discourse can encourage an increasingly global moral horizon in audiences and encourage solidarity towards distant suffering (Chouliaraki, 2006; Kyriakidou 2014; Linklater, 2007). It is this line of argumentation that is further explored in our study. The study is based on six focus groups (total of 27 participants) during which people were shown a news item of the Dutch national news broadcaster on the humanitarian situation during the 2011 Horn of Africa crisis. In the subsequent group discussions, particular attention was paid to people's reflection about their own moral responsibility towards the distant suffering.},
  author       = {Huiberts, Eline},
  booktitle    = {ICA's 66th Annual Conference - Communicating with Power},
  keywords     = {Audience Studies,Distant Suffering,Focus Groups,Globalization,Cosmopolitanism,Moral Psychology},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Fukuoka, Japan},
  title        = {How to react - Moral Reflections of an Audience to Messages of Distant Suffering},
  url          = {https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ica/ica16/index.php?cmd=Online+Program+View+Person&selected_people_id=6734683&PHPSESSID=2s0plmcpkui6vqfioh55lqh3r1},
  year         = {2016},
}