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Marketing of Cherimoya in the Andes for the benefit of the rural poor and as a tool for agrobiodiversity conservation

Wouter Vanhove UGent and Patrick Van Damme UGent (2009) Acta Horticulturae. 806. p.497-503
abstract
Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is an exquisite subtropical fruit, intensively cultivated in Spain, but generally underutilized in the inter-Andean valleys where the species shows high botanical diversity. Economic use of Andean cherimoyas currently remains far below potential levels. In 2006-2007, a cherimoya value chain analysis was performed through a market survey in which structured interviews were made with 172 cherimoya producers and 346 cherimoya traders in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Two main flows of cherimoya were observed in all markets studied. The first flow pertains to locally produced cherimoya fruits that have irregular quality due to high infestation levels of fruit flies. These fruits are inadequately packed and transported, and consequently have a low economic value to both producers and traders. The other flow consists of cherimoyas produced in the Huarochir province (Lima Department, Peru), commonly known as 'Cumbe', a collective trademark registered by producers from the Cumbe Valley. This trademark which serves as a geographical indication currently lacks appropriate legal protection. Consequently, illegal application of the 'Cumbe'-label is widespread. 'Cumbe' fruits are intensively selected and graded on wholesaler markets in the Lima metropolis and distributed in wooden crates to main markets both within Peru and to its neighboring countries Ecuador and Bolivia. Fruit characterization data show that 'Cumbe' fruits are partly distinctive from other Andean cherimoyas. The value of the collective trademark 'Cumbe' should thus be attributed not only to elite germplasm and appropriate cultivation practices, but also to the intensive selection, grading, and packaging process. As a result of higher product quality, 'Cumbe' cherimoya market prices are up to twice or more of the prices for local cherimoyas. More denominations of origin, locally managed by producer organizations, are valuable tools for both conserving on-farm cherimoya diversity and additional income generation for the rural Andean poor.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
denomination of origin, agrobiodiversity, cherimoya, underutilized species
in
Acta Horticulturae
Acta Hortic.
editor
Hannah Jaenicke, J Ganry, I Hoeschle-Zeledon and R Kahane
volume
806
issue title
Proceedings of the international symposium on underutilized plants for food security, nutrition, income and sustainable development
pages
497 - 503
publisher
International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)
place of publication
Leuven, Belgium
conference name
International symposium on Underutilized Plants for Food Security, Nutrition, Income and Sustainable Development
conference location
Arusha, Tanzania
conference start
2008-03-03
conference end
2008-03-06
Web of Science type
Proceedings Paper
Web of Science id
000305214400062
ISSN
0567-7572
ISBN
9789066057012
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
P1
id
850392
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-850392
alternative location
http://www.actahort.org/books/806/806_62.htm
date created
2010-02-03 10:38:11
date last changed
2013-02-06 13:32:35
@inproceedings{850392,
  abstract     = {Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is an exquisite subtropical fruit, intensively cultivated in Spain, but generally underutilized in the inter-Andean valleys where the species shows high botanical diversity. Economic use of Andean cherimoyas currently remains far below potential levels. In 2006-2007, a cherimoya value chain analysis was performed through a market survey in which structured interviews were made with 172 cherimoya producers and 346 cherimoya traders in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Two main flows of cherimoya were observed in all markets studied. The first flow pertains to locally produced cherimoya fruits that have irregular quality due to high infestation levels of fruit flies. These fruits are inadequately packed and transported, and consequently have a low economic value to both producers and traders. The other flow consists of cherimoyas produced in the Huarochir province (Lima Department, Peru), commonly known as 'Cumbe', a collective trademark registered by producers from the Cumbe Valley. This trademark which serves as a geographical indication currently lacks appropriate legal protection. Consequently, illegal application of the 'Cumbe'-label is widespread. 'Cumbe' fruits are intensively selected and graded on wholesaler markets in the Lima metropolis and distributed in wooden crates to main markets both within Peru and to its neighboring countries Ecuador and Bolivia. Fruit characterization data show that 'Cumbe' fruits are partly distinctive from other Andean cherimoyas. The value of the collective trademark 'Cumbe' should thus be attributed not only to elite germplasm and appropriate cultivation practices, but also to the intensive selection, grading, and packaging process. As a result of higher product quality, 'Cumbe' cherimoya market prices are up to twice or more of the prices for local cherimoyas. More denominations of origin, locally managed by producer organizations, are valuable tools for both conserving on-farm cherimoya diversity and additional income generation for the rural Andean poor.},
  author       = {Vanhove, Wouter and Van Damme, Patrick},
  booktitle    = {Acta Horticulturae},
  editor       = {Jaenicke, Hannah and Ganry, J and Hoeschle-Zeledon, I and Kahane, R},
  isbn         = {9789066057012},
  issn         = {0567-7572},
  keyword      = {denomination of origin,agrobiodiversity,cherimoya,underutilized species},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Arusha, Tanzania},
  pages        = {497--503},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {Marketing of Cherimoya in the Andes for the benefit of the rural poor and as a tool for agrobiodiversity conservation},
  url          = {http://www.actahort.org/books/806/806\_62.htm},
  volume       = {806},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Vanhove, Wouter, and Patrick Van Damme. 2009. “Marketing of Cherimoya in the Andes for the Benefit of the Rural Poor and as a Tool for Agrobiodiversity Conservation.” In Acta Horticulturae, ed. Hannah Jaenicke, J Ganry, I Hoeschle-Zeledon, and R Kahane, 806:497–503. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
APA
Vanhove, W., & Van Damme, P. (2009). Marketing of Cherimoya in the Andes for the benefit of the rural poor and as a tool for agrobiodiversity conservation. In H. Jaenicke, J. Ganry, I. Hoeschle-Zeledon, & R. Kahane (Eds.), Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 806, pp. 497–503). Presented at the International symposium on Underutilized Plants for Food Security, Nutrition, Income and Sustainable Development, Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
Vanhove W, Van Damme P. Marketing of Cherimoya in the Andes for the benefit of the rural poor and as a tool for agrobiodiversity conservation. In: Jaenicke H, Ganry J, Hoeschle-Zeledon I, Kahane R, editors. Acta Horticulturae. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2009. p. 497–503.
MLA
Vanhove, Wouter, and Patrick Van Damme. “Marketing of Cherimoya in the Andes for the Benefit of the Rural Poor and as a Tool for Agrobiodiversity Conservation.” Acta Horticulturae. Ed. Hannah Jaenicke et al. Vol. 806. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2009. 497–503. Print.