Advanced search
1 file | 20.77 MB Add to list

Microbially managed organic growing media for greenhouse horticulture

Oliver Grunert (UGent)
(2017)
Author
Promoter
(UGent) , (UGent) and (UGent)
Organization
Abstract
The production of vegetables in growing media is an efficient way to produce vegetables in soilless culture systems. The management of the microbial community associated with growing media may serve as potential sustainable pathway to increase eco-efficiency. Consequently, it is important to find out how biotic and abiotic factors affect the composition and diversity of microbial communities associated with growing media. The aim of this PhD thesis was to study the ecology of the microbial community in soilless culture systems. First, the microbial community of a mineral and an organic growing medium was examined and it was found that both growing media have a distinct, microbial community structure. Second, key functionalities of growing media and their individual constituents were quantified. Particularly, the nitrogen dynamics were studied in relation to the microbial community associated with plant and growing medium. Third, the valorization of recycled nutrients as a high-value microalgae fertilizer and struvite was investigated. In addition, an adapted fertigation strategy in combination with organic fertilizers was developed to narrow the yield gap with a pure mineral growing medium when cultivating tomatoes. Afterwards, the microbial community structure of four contrasting soil and soilless tomato cultivating systems were studied. Finally, the effect of fertilizers and plant type on the microbial community structure of the rhizosphere and the bulk zone were investigated. Overall, organic growing media show a potential for developing novel cultivating systems fitting into a more sustainable horticulture.
Keywords
Growing media, microbial ecology, tomato, organic fertilizer, hairy roots syndrome, horticulture, soilless culture systems

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 20.77 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Grunert, Oliver. “Microbially Managed Organic Growing Media for Greenhouse Horticulture.” 2017 : n. pag. Print.
APA
Grunert, O. (2017). Microbially managed organic growing media for greenhouse horticulture. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Grunert, Oliver. 2017. “Microbially Managed Organic Growing Media for Greenhouse Horticulture”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Grunert, Oliver. 2017. “Microbially Managed Organic Growing Media for Greenhouse Horticulture”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
Vancouver
1.
Grunert O. Microbially managed organic growing media for greenhouse horticulture. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2017.
IEEE
[1]
O. Grunert, “Microbially managed organic growing media for greenhouse horticulture,” Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium, 2017.
@phdthesis{8503144,
  abstract     = {The production of vegetables in growing media is an efficient way to produce vegetables in soilless culture systems. The management of the microbial community associated with growing media may serve as potential sustainable pathway to increase eco-efficiency. Consequently, it is important to find out how biotic and abiotic factors affect the composition and diversity of microbial communities associated with growing media.
The aim of this PhD thesis was to study the ecology of the microbial community in soilless culture systems. First, the microbial community of a mineral and an organic growing medium was examined and it was found that both growing media have a distinct, microbial community structure. Second, key functionalities of growing media and their individual constituents were quantified. Particularly, the nitrogen dynamics were studied in relation to the microbial community associated with plant and growing medium. Third, the valorization of recycled nutrients as a high-value microalgae fertilizer and struvite was investigated. In addition, an adapted fertigation strategy in combination with organic fertilizers was developed to narrow the yield gap with a pure mineral growing medium when cultivating tomatoes. Afterwards, the microbial community structure of four contrasting soil and soilless tomato cultivating systems were studied. Finally, the effect of fertilizers and plant type on the microbial community structure of the rhizosphere and the bulk zone were investigated. Overall, organic growing media show a potential for developing novel cultivating systems fitting into a more sustainable horticulture.},
  author       = {Grunert, Oliver},
  isbn         = {9789059899612},
  keywords     = {Growing media,microbial ecology,tomato,organic fertilizer,hairy roots syndrome,horticulture,soilless culture systems},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {IX, 259 + bibliography},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Microbially managed organic growing media for greenhouse horticulture},
  year         = {2017},
}