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The processing of singular and plural nouns in English, French, and Dutch : new insights from megastudies

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Abstract
In this study, we explored the processing of singular and plural word forms, using megastudies in French, English, and Dutch. For singulars, we observed a base frequency effect but no surface frequency effect. For plurals, the effect depended on the frequency of the word form. When the word form had a frequency above a threshold value, we observed both surface and base frequency effects; for the frequencies below the threshold, we found a base frequency effect only, suggesting full decomposition for these words. The threshold differed between the languages, suggesting that more plurals are decomposed in French than in Dutch and more in Dutch than in English. In contrast, for all languages the singular form seems to be coactivated whenever the plural form is processed. These results are interpreted in light of some of the main models of morphological processing.
Keywords
VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION, MORPHO-ORTHOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION, LEXICAL DECISION DATA, MORPHOLOGICAL DECOMPOSITION, INFLECTIONAL MORPHOLOGY, FILM SUBTITLES, PROJECT, FREQUENCIES, DATABASE, visual word recognition, morphology, plural, megastudy

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Chicago
Gimenes, Manuel, Marc Brysbaert, and Boris New. 2016. “The Processing of Singular and Plural Nouns in English, French, and Dutch : New Insights from Megastudies.” Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology-revue Canadienne De Psychologie Experimentale 70 (4): 316–324.
APA
Gimenes, M., Brysbaert, M., & New, B. (2016). The processing of singular and plural nouns in English, French, and Dutch : new insights from megastudies. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE, 70(4), 316–324.
Vancouver
1.
Gimenes M, Brysbaert M, New B. The processing of singular and plural nouns in English, French, and Dutch : new insights from megastudies. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE. 2016;70(4):316–24.
MLA
Gimenes, Manuel, Marc Brysbaert, and Boris New. “The Processing of Singular and Plural Nouns in English, French, and Dutch : New Insights from Megastudies.” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE 70.4 (2016): 316–324. Print.
@article{8502859,
  abstract     = {In this study, we explored the processing of singular and plural word forms, using megastudies in French, English, and Dutch. For singulars, we observed a base frequency effect but no surface frequency effect. For plurals, the effect depended on the frequency of the word form. When the word form had a frequency above a threshold value, we observed both surface and base frequency effects; for the frequencies below the threshold, we found a base frequency effect only, suggesting full decomposition for these words. The threshold differed between the languages, suggesting that more plurals are decomposed in French than in Dutch and more in Dutch than in English. In contrast, for all languages the singular form seems to be coactivated whenever the plural form is processed. These results are interpreted in light of some of the main models of morphological processing.},
  author       = {Gimenes, Manuel and Brysbaert, Marc and New, Boris},
  issn         = {1196-1961},
  journal      = {CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {316--324},
  title        = {The processing of singular and plural nouns in English, French, and Dutch : new insights from megastudies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cep0000074},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2016},
}

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