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Von dem Trauma des anderen und der Sehnsucht nach Behausung in Lutz Seilers Roman Kruso (2014)

(2017) ARCADIA. 52(2). p.320-345
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Abstract
Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s concept of the ‘body not at home’ on the one hand and on the concept of the disturbing ‘foreign body’ (Fremdkörper) as deployed in various trauma studies on the other, this article explores how the traumatized body is to be understood as a disoriented and unstable body. Trauma, however, is not only something that leaves one restless. It also connects one with the trauma of another and leads to mutual understanding. Having been affected by the wound of another, a certain kind of communication among the wounded emerges, which makes traumatic memory accessible. How such an affective impact may look can be shown by examining Lutz Seiler’s award-winning novel Kruso (2014). Set on the isle of Hiddensee shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Seiler tells the story of two men, Kruso and Ed, both traumatized by the loss of a loved one. As both are East German castaways and equally affected by their loss, they develop an intimate relationship, one not void of suppressed desire, mistrust, and aggression. Only years after Kruso’s death is Ed able to come to terms with the past and find a place for burying the vanished dead.
Keywords
trauma, body, affection, suppressed desire, fall of the Berlin Wall

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Wennerscheid, Sophie. 2017. “Von Dem Trauma Des Anderen Und Der Sehnsucht Nach Behausung in Lutz Seilers Roman Kruso (2014).” Arcadia 52 (2): 320–345.
APA
Wennerscheid, S. (2017). Von dem Trauma des anderen und der Sehnsucht nach Behausung in Lutz Seilers Roman Kruso (2014). ARCADIA, 52(2), 320–345.
Vancouver
1.
Wennerscheid S. Von dem Trauma des anderen und der Sehnsucht nach Behausung in Lutz Seilers Roman Kruso (2014). ARCADIA. Berlin: De Gruyter; 2017;52(2):320–45.
MLA
Wennerscheid, Sophie. “Von Dem Trauma Des Anderen Und Der Sehnsucht Nach Behausung in Lutz Seilers Roman Kruso (2014).” ARCADIA 52.2 (2017): 320–345. Print.
@article{8501650,
  abstract     = {Drawing on Sara Ahmed{\textquoteright}s concept of the {\textquoteleft}body not at home{\textquoteright} on the one hand and on the concept of the disturbing {\textquoteleft}foreign body{\textquoteright} (Fremdk{\"o}rper) as deployed in various trauma studies on the other, this article explores how the traumatized body is to be understood as a disoriented and unstable body. Trauma, however, is not only something that leaves one restless. It also connects one with the trauma of another and leads to mutual understanding. Having been affected by the wound of another, a certain kind of communication among the wounded emerges, which makes traumatic memory accessible. How such an affective impact may look can be shown by examining Lutz Seiler{\textquoteright}s award-winning novel Kruso (2014). Set on the isle of Hiddensee shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Seiler tells the story of two men, Kruso and Ed, both traumatized by the loss of a loved one. As both are East German castaways and equally affected by their loss, they develop an intimate relationship, one not void of suppressed desire, mistrust, and aggression. Only years after Kruso{\textquoteright}s death is Ed able to come to terms with the past and find a place for burying the vanished dead.},
  author       = {Wennerscheid, Sophie},
  issn         = {0003-7982},
  journal      = {ARCADIA},
  keyword      = {trauma,body,affection,suppressed desire,fall of the Berlin Wall},
  language     = {ger},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {320--345},
  publisher    = {De Gruyter},
  title        = {Von dem Trauma des anderen und der Sehnsucht nach Behausung in Lutz Seilers Roman Kruso (2014)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1515/arcadia-2017-0036},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2017},
}

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