Advanced search
1 file | 2.02 MB

Food insecurity and common mental disorders among Ethiopian youth : structural equation modeling

(2016) PLOS ONE. 11(11).
Author
Organization
Abstract
Background: Although the consequences of food insecurity on physical health and nutritional status of youth living have been reported, its effect on their mental health remains less investigated in developing countries. The aim of this study was to examine the pathways through which food insecurity is associated with poor mental health status among youth living in Ethiopia. Methods: We used data from Jimma Longitudinal Family Survey of Youth (JLFSY) collected in 2009/ 10. A total of 1,521 youth were included in the analysis. We measured food insecurity using a 5-items scale and common mental disorders using the 20-item Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). Structural and generalized equation modeling using maximum likelihood estimation method was used to analyze the data. Results: The prevalence of common mental disorders was 30.8% (95% CI: 28.6, 33.2). Food insecurity was independently associated with common mental disorders (beta = 0.323, P<0.05). Most (91.8%) of the effect of food insecurity on common mental disorders was direct and only 8.2% of their relationship was partially mediated by physical health. In addition, poor self-rated health (beta = 0.285, P< 0.05), high socioeconomic status (beta = -0.076, P< 0.05), parental education (beta = 0.183, P< 0.05), living in urban area (beta=0.139, P< 0.05), and female-headed household (beta = 0.192, P< 0.05) were associated with common mental disorders. Conclusions: Food insecurity is directly associated with common mental disorders among youth in Ethiopia. Interventions that aim to improve mental health status of youth should consider strategies to improve access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food.
Keywords
SELF-REPORTING QUESTIONNAIRE, FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE, DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES, SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA, WELFARE RECIPIENTS, FAMILY INCOME, JIMMA ZONE, HEALTH, INSUFFICIENCY, VALIDATION

Downloads

  • 8152238.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 2.02 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Jebena, Mulusew Gerbaba, David Lindstrom, Tefera Belachew Lema, Craig Hadley, Carl Lachat, Roosmarijn Verstraeten, Nathalie De Cock, and Patrick Kolsteren. 2016. “Food Insecurity and Common Mental Disorders Among Ethiopian Youth : Structural Equation Modeling.” Plos One 11 (11).
APA
Jebena, Mulusew Gerbaba, Lindstrom, D., Lema, T. B., Hadley, C., Lachat, C., Verstraeten, R., De Cock, N., et al. (2016). Food insecurity and common mental disorders among Ethiopian youth : structural equation modeling. PLOS ONE, 11(11).
Vancouver
1.
Jebena MG, Lindstrom D, Lema TB, Hadley C, Lachat C, Verstraeten R, et al. Food insecurity and common mental disorders among Ethiopian youth : structural equation modeling. PLOS ONE. 2016;11(11).
MLA
Jebena, Mulusew Gerbaba, David Lindstrom, Tefera Belachew Lema, et al. “Food Insecurity and Common Mental Disorders Among Ethiopian Youth : Structural Equation Modeling.” PLOS ONE 11.11 (2016): n. pag. Print.
@article{8501583,
  abstract     = {Background: Although the consequences of food insecurity on physical health and nutritional status of youth living have been reported, its effect on their mental health remains less investigated in developing countries. The aim of this study was to examine the pathways through which food insecurity is associated with poor mental health status among youth living in Ethiopia. 
Methods: We used data from Jimma Longitudinal Family Survey of Youth (JLFSY) collected in 2009/ 10. A total of 1,521 youth were included in the analysis. We measured food insecurity using a 5-items scale and common mental disorders using the 20-item Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). Structural and generalized equation modeling using maximum likelihood estimation method was used to analyze the data. 
Results: The prevalence of common mental disorders was 30.8\% (95\% CI: 28.6, 33.2). Food insecurity was independently associated with common mental disorders (beta = 0.323, P{\textlangle}0.05). Most (91.8\%) of the effect of food insecurity on common mental disorders was direct and only 8.2\% of their relationship was partially mediated by physical health. In addition, poor self-rated health (beta = 0.285, P{\textlangle} 0.05), high socioeconomic status (beta = -0.076, P{\textlangle} 0.05), parental education (beta = 0.183, P{\textlangle} 0.05), living in urban area (beta=0.139, P{\textlangle} 0.05), and female-headed household (beta = 0.192, P{\textlangle} 0.05) were associated with common mental disorders. 
Conclusions: Food insecurity is directly associated with common mental disorders among youth in Ethiopia. Interventions that aim to improve mental health status of youth should consider strategies to improve access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food.},
  articleno    = {e0165931},
  author       = {Jebena, Mulusew Gerbaba and Lindstrom, David and Lema, Tefera Belachew and Hadley, Craig and Lachat, Carl and Verstraeten, Roosmarijn and De Cock, Nathalie and Kolsteren, Patrick},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {SELF-REPORTING QUESTIONNAIRE,FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE,DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES,SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA,WELFARE RECIPIENTS,FAMILY INCOME,JIMMA ZONE,HEALTH,INSUFFICIENCY,VALIDATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {20},
  title        = {Food insecurity and common mental disorders among Ethiopian youth : structural equation modeling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0165931},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: