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Eco-evolutionary dynamics during range expansion in a herbivorous arthropod

(2016)
Author
Promoter
(UGent) and Robby Stoks
Organization
Abstract
The earth’s climate has a history of alternating glacial and interglacial periods, which have recurrently forced major rearrangements in species assemblages. Today, however, scientists are worried because the predicted rate of climate change is faster than any of these past temperature changes, and anticipated to have dramatic consequences for the earth’s biodiversity. One way in which species may respond to the current global warming, is by shifting their range pole- or upwards. During such shifts, individuals encounter changing environmental conditions (like a shortened breeding season) and become assorted according to their dispersal capacities (best dispersers at the front). Range shifts thus entail strong selection pressures that may profoundly shape range front phenotypes. This PhD thesis studies the ecological and evolutionary processes related to range shifts, using the two-spotted spider mite (a herbivorous pest that recently expanded its European range northwards) as a model species.
Keywords
ecology, evolution, climate change, range expansion

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Petegem, Katrien. 2016. “Eco-evolutionary Dynamics During Range Expansion in a Herbivorous Arthropod”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences.
APA
Van Petegem, Katrien. (2016). Eco-evolutionary dynamics during range expansion in a herbivorous arthropod. Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Van Petegem K. Eco-evolutionary dynamics during range expansion in a herbivorous arthropod. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences; 2016.
MLA
Van Petegem, Katrien. “Eco-evolutionary Dynamics During Range Expansion in a Herbivorous Arthropod.” 2016 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{8500990,
  abstract     = {The earth{\textquoteright}s climate has a history of alternating glacial and interglacial periods, which have recurrently forced major rearrangements in species assemblages. Today, however, scientists are worried because the predicted rate of climate change is faster than any of these past temperature changes, and anticipated to have dramatic consequences for the earth{\textquoteright}s biodiversity. One way in which species may respond to the current global warming, is by shifting their range pole- or upwards. During such shifts, individuals encounter changing environmental conditions (like a shortened breeding season) and become assorted according to their dispersal capacities (best dispersers at the front). Range shifts thus entail strong selection pressures that may profoundly shape range front phenotypes. This PhD thesis studies the ecological and evolutionary processes related to range shifts, using the two-spotted spider mite (a herbivorous pest that recently expanded its European range northwards) as a model species.},
  author       = {Van Petegem, Katrien},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {334},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Eco-evolutionary dynamics during range expansion in a herbivorous arthropod},
  year         = {2016},
}