Advanced search
1 file | 635.97 KB

Diet-related DNA adduct formation in relation to carcinogenesis

Lieselot Hemeryck (UGent) and Lynn Vanhaecke (UGent)
(2016) NUTRITION REVIEWS. 74(8). p.475-489
Author
Organization
Abstract
The human diet contributes significantly to the initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis. It has become clear that the human diet contains several groups of natural foodborne chemicals that are at least in part responsible for the genotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic potential of certain foodstuffs. Electrophilic chemicals are prone to attack nucleophilic sites in DNA, resulting in the formation of altered nucleobases, also known as DNA adducts. Since DNA adduct formation is believed to signal the onset of chemically induced carcinogenesis, the DNA adduct-inducing potential of certain foodstuffs has been investigated to gain more insight into diet-related pathways of carcinogenesis. Many studies have investigated diet-related DNA adduct formation. This review summarizes work on known or suspected dietary carcinogens and the role of DNA adduct formation in hypothesized carcinogenesis pathways.
Keywords
cancer risk, carcinogenesis, DNA damage, food chemicals, food contaminants, toxins, PROCESSED MEAT CONSUMPTION, N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS, POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS, WHITE BLOOD-CELLS, CALF THYMUS DNA, HUMAN P53 GENE, ARISTOLOCHIC ACID, LIPID-PEROXIDATION, CANCER-RISK, IN-VIVO

Downloads

    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 635.97 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Hemeryck, Lieselot, and Lynn Vanhaecke. 2016. “Diet-related DNA Adduct Formation in Relation to Carcinogenesis.” Nutrition Reviews 74 (8): 475–489.
APA
Hemeryck, L., & Vanhaecke, L. (2016). Diet-related DNA adduct formation in relation to carcinogenesis. NUTRITION REVIEWS, 74(8), 475–489.
Vancouver
1.
Hemeryck L, Vanhaecke L. Diet-related DNA adduct formation in relation to carcinogenesis. NUTRITION REVIEWS. 2016;74(8):475–89.
MLA
Hemeryck, Lieselot, and Lynn Vanhaecke. “Diet-related DNA Adduct Formation in Relation to Carcinogenesis.” NUTRITION REVIEWS 74.8 (2016): 475–489. Print.
@article{8500960,
  abstract     = {The human diet contributes significantly to the initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis. It has become clear that the human diet contains several groups of natural foodborne chemicals that are at least in part responsible for the genotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic potential of certain foodstuffs. Electrophilic chemicals are prone to attack nucleophilic sites in DNA, resulting in the formation of altered nucleobases, also known as DNA adducts. Since DNA adduct formation is believed to signal the onset of chemically induced carcinogenesis, the DNA adduct-inducing potential of certain foodstuffs has been investigated to gain more insight into diet-related pathways of carcinogenesis. Many studies have investigated diet-related DNA adduct formation. This review summarizes work on known or suspected dietary carcinogens and the role of DNA adduct formation in hypothesized carcinogenesis pathways.},
  author       = {Hemeryck, Lieselot and Vanhaecke, Lynn},
  issn         = {0029-6643},
  journal      = {NUTRITION REVIEWS},
  keyword      = {cancer risk,carcinogenesis,DNA damage,food chemicals,food contaminants,toxins,PROCESSED MEAT CONSUMPTION,N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS,POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS,WHITE BLOOD-CELLS,CALF THYMUS DNA,HUMAN P53 GENE,ARISTOLOCHIC ACID,LIPID-PEROXIDATION,CANCER-RISK,IN-VIVO},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {475--489},
  title        = {Diet-related DNA adduct formation in relation to carcinogenesis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuw017},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {2016},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: