Advanced search
1 file | 453.54 KB

Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Is Associated with Vascular Disease and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background and objectives: As a major component of uremic syndrome, cardiovascular disease is largely responsible for the high mortality observed in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Preclinical studies have evidenced an association between serum levels of indoxyl sulfate (IS, a protein-bound uremic toxin) and vascular alterations. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between serum IS, vascular calcification, vascular stiffness, and mortality in a cohort of CKD patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: One-hundred and thirty-nine patients (mean +/- SD age: 67 +/- 12; 60% male) at different stages of CKD (8% at stage 2, 26.5% at stage 3, 26.5% at stage 4, 7% at stage 5, and 32% at stage 5D) were enrolled. Results: Baseline IS levels presented an inverse relationship with renal function and a direct relationship with aortic calcification and pulse wave velocity. During the follow-up period (605 +/- 217 d), 25 patients died, mostly because of cardiovascular events (n = 18). In crude survival analyses, the highest IS tertile was a powerful predictor of overall and cardiovascular mortality (P = 0.001 and 0.012, respectively). The predictive power of IS for death was maintained after adjustment for age, gender, diabetes, albumin, hemoglobin, phosphate, and aortic calcification. Conclusions: The study presented here indicates that IS may have a significant role in the vascular disease and higher mortality observed in CKD patients.
Keywords
UREMIC TOXINS, INTIMA-MEDIA THICKNESS, AORTIC CALCIFICATION, CREATININE, PROLIFERATION, CELLS, PROGRESSION, ARTERIAL STIFFNESS, OXIDATIVE STRESS, CHRONIC-RENAL-FAILURE

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 453.54 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Barreto, FC, DV Barreto, S Liabeuf, Natalie Meert, Griet Glorieux, M Temmar, G Choukroun, Raymond Vanholder, and ZA Massy. 2009. “Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Is Associated with Vascular Disease and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.” Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 4 (10): 1551–1558.
APA
Barreto, F., Barreto, D., Liabeuf, S., Meert, N., Glorieux, G., Temmar, M., Choukroun, G., et al. (2009). Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Is Associated with Vascular Disease and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients. CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY, 4(10), 1551–1558.
Vancouver
1.
Barreto F, Barreto D, Liabeuf S, Meert N, Glorieux G, Temmar M, et al. Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Is Associated with Vascular Disease and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients. CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY. WASHINGTON: AMER SOC NEPHROLOGY; 2009;4(10):1551–8.
MLA
Barreto, FC, DV Barreto, S Liabeuf, et al. “Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Is Associated with Vascular Disease and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.” CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY 4.10 (2009): 1551–1558. Print.
@article{849213,
  abstract     = {Background and objectives: As a major component of uremic syndrome, cardiovascular disease is largely responsible for the high mortality observed in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Preclinical studies have evidenced an association between serum levels of indoxyl sulfate (IS, a protein-bound uremic toxin) and vascular alterations. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between serum IS, vascular calcification, vascular stiffness, and mortality in a cohort of CKD patients.

Design, setting, participants, \& measurements: One-hundred and thirty-nine patients (mean +/- SD age: 67 +/- 12; 60\% male) at different stages of CKD (8\% at stage 2, 26.5\% at stage 3, 26.5\% at stage 4, 7\% at stage 5, and 32\% at stage 5D) were enrolled.

Results: Baseline IS levels presented an inverse relationship with renal function and a direct relationship with aortic calcification and pulse wave velocity. During the follow-up period (605 +/- 217 d), 25 patients died, mostly because of cardiovascular events (n = 18). In crude survival analyses, the highest IS tertile was a powerful predictor of overall and cardiovascular mortality (P = 0.001 and 0.012, respectively). The predictive power of IS for death was maintained after adjustment for age, gender, diabetes, albumin, hemoglobin, phosphate, and aortic calcification.

Conclusions: The study presented here indicates that IS may have a significant role in the vascular disease and higher mortality observed in CKD patients.},
  author       = {Barreto, FC and Barreto, DV and Liabeuf, S and Meert, Natalie and Glorieux, Griet and Temmar, M and Choukroun, G and Vanholder, Raymond and Massy, ZA},
  issn         = {1555-9041},
  journal      = {CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1551--1558},
  publisher    = {AMER SOC NEPHROLOGY},
  title        = {Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Is Associated with Vascular Disease and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2215/CJN.03980609},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2009},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: