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Solifenacin for therapy resistant overactive bladder

Piet Hoebeke (UGent) , Jan De Pooter (UGent) , Karel Decaestecker (UGent) , Ann Raes (UGent) , Jo Dehoorne (UGent) , Erik Van Laecke (UGent) and Johan Vande Walle (UGent)
(2009) JOURNAL OF UROLOGY. 182(4). p.2040-2044
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Organization
Abstract
Purpose: With the availability of the once daily oral antimuscarinic agent solifenacin (5 mg), we started to use it for therapy resistant overactive bladder. We evaluate side effects and efficacy. Material and Methods: We reviewed the charts of children treated with solifenacin succinate between August 2005 and August 2008 for therapy resistant OAB. Incontinence was compared at study entry and study end. Results: During the study period 84 boys and 54 girls with a mean age of 9 years 2 months received solifenacin. Mean followup was 22.59 months. While on solifenacin, side effects were observed in 9 of 138 patients (6.5%). Efficacy evaluation included only 99 patients after 3 months of therapy. Mean voided volume after treatment was 253.5 ml, showing a significant 25% increase compared to the mean value before therapy (50.5 vs 203.0 ml, p < 0.01). Of the patients 84 (85%) were considered responders, including 45 who were completely dry (full response) and 39 who had fewer nocturnal enuresis or diurnal incontinence symptoms (partial response). Of these 39 patients 17 became dry during the day, I became dry during the night and 21 had more than a 50% decrease in nocturnal enuresis and diurnal incontinence symptoms. In 15 patients the outcome was unchanged or worse (no response). Conclusion: In this group of children with OAB we noted favorable results with solifenacin with few side effects. Despite the uncontrolled, retrospective study design the effect is attributable to solifenacin intake.
Keywords
CHILDREN, drug resistance, nocturnal enuresis, anticholinergics, urinary bladder, overactive, urinary incontinence

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Chicago
Hoebeke, Piet, Jan De Pooter, Karel Decaestecker, Ann Raes, Jo Dehoorne, Erik Van Laecke, and Johan Vande Walle. 2009. “Solifenacin for Therapy Resistant Overactive Bladder.” Journal of Urology 182 (4): 2040–2044.
APA
Hoebeke, P., De Pooter, J., Decaestecker, K., Raes, A., Dehoorne, J., Van Laecke, E., & Vande Walle, J. (2009). Solifenacin for therapy resistant overactive bladder. JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, 182(4), 2040–2044. Presented at the 60th Annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics/International Childrens Continence Society.
Vancouver
1.
Hoebeke P, De Pooter J, Decaestecker K, Raes A, Dehoorne J, Van Laecke E, et al. Solifenacin for therapy resistant overactive bladder. JOURNAL OF UROLOGY. 2009;182(4):2040–4.
MLA
Hoebeke, Piet et al. “Solifenacin for Therapy Resistant Overactive Bladder.” JOURNAL OF UROLOGY 182.4 (2009): 2040–2044. Print.
@article{848256,
  abstract     = {Purpose: With the availability of the once daily oral antimuscarinic agent solifenacin (5 mg), we started to use it for therapy resistant overactive bladder. We evaluate side effects and efficacy.
Material and Methods: We reviewed the charts of children treated with solifenacin succinate between August 2005 and August 2008 for therapy resistant OAB. Incontinence was compared at study entry and study end.
Results: During the study period 84 boys and 54 girls with a mean age of 9 years 2 months received solifenacin. Mean followup was 22.59 months. While on solifenacin, side effects were observed in 9 of 138 patients (6.5%). Efficacy evaluation included only 99 patients after 3 months of therapy. Mean voided volume after treatment was 253.5 ml, showing a significant 25% increase compared to the mean value before therapy (50.5 vs 203.0 ml, p < 0.01). Of the patients 84 (85%) were considered responders, including 45 who were completely dry (full response) and 39 who had fewer nocturnal enuresis or diurnal incontinence symptoms (partial response). Of these 39 patients 17 became dry during the day, I became dry during the night and 21 had more than a 50% decrease in nocturnal enuresis and diurnal incontinence symptoms. In 15 patients the outcome was unchanged or worse (no response).
Conclusion: In this group of children with OAB we noted favorable results with solifenacin with few side effects. Despite the uncontrolled, retrospective study design the effect is attributable to solifenacin intake.},
  author       = {Hoebeke, Piet and De Pooter, Jan and Decaestecker, Karel and Raes, Ann and Dehoorne, Jo and Van Laecke, Erik and Vande Walle, Johan},
  issn         = {0022-5347},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF UROLOGY},
  keywords     = {CHILDREN,drug resistance,nocturnal enuresis,anticholinergics,urinary bladder,overactive,urinary incontinence},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Boston, MA, USA},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {2040--2044},
  title        = {Solifenacin for therapy resistant overactive bladder},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2009.05.100},
  volume       = {182},
  year         = {2009},
}

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