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African botanical heritage for new crop development

Patrick Van Damme UGent and Céline Termote UGent (2008) AFRIKA FOCUS. 21(1). p.45-64
abstract
The African continent is rather poor in plant biodiversity when compared to other continents on and around the equator. Nevertheless, lots of useful plant species have been domesticated from Sub-Sahara Africa material. Ethnobotanical research offers the possibility to collect information on use and utility of wild plant species from traditional people often living in or close to a challenging natural environment. This type of information then allows us to find new candidates for domestication and subsequent crop development for income generation and increased food security. The case of Gnetum africanum illustrates the practical implications of developing a lesser-known species, and highlights the institutional problems that go together with niche crop development. The latter are subsequently presented and discussed in extenso, and solutions proposed in a second part of this review text.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Value Chain, Marketing, Non-timber Forest Product, Ethnobotany, Domestication
journal title
AFRIKA FOCUS
Afr. Focus
editor
Johan De Smedt UGent
volume
21
issue
1
issue title
GAPSYM1 Heritage and/as REproduction in Africa
pages
45 - 64
ISSN
0772-084X
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
847510
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-847510
alternative location
http://www.gap.ugent.be/africafocus/pdf/08VanDamme-Fullpaper.pdf
date created
2010-02-01 10:51:36
date last changed
2010-02-08 15:34:43
@article{847510,
  abstract     = {The African continent is rather poor in plant biodiversity when compared to other continents on and around the equator. Nevertheless, lots of useful plant species have been domesticated from Sub-Sahara Africa material. Ethnobotanical research offers the possibility to collect information on use and utility of wild plant species from traditional people often living in or close to a challenging natural environment. This type of information then allows us to find new candidates for domestication and subsequent crop development for income generation and increased food security. The case of Gnetum africanum illustrates the practical implications of developing a lesser-known species, and highlights the institutional problems that go together with niche crop development. The latter are subsequently presented and discussed in extenso, and solutions proposed in a second part of this review text.},
  author       = {Van Damme, Patrick and Termote, C{\'e}line},
  editor       = {De Smedt, Johan},
  issn         = {0772-084X},
  journal      = {AFRIKA FOCUS},
  keyword      = {Value Chain,Marketing,Non-timber Forest Product,Ethnobotany,Domestication},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {45--64},
  title        = {African botanical heritage for new crop development},
  url          = {http://www.gap.ugent.be/africafocus/pdf/08VanDamme-Fullpaper.pdf},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Van Damme, Patrick, and Céline Termote. 2008. “African Botanical Heritage for New Crop Development.” Ed. Johan De Smedt. Afrika Focus 21 (1): 45–64.
APA
Van Damme, Patrick, & Termote, C. (2008). African botanical heritage for new crop development. (J. De Smedt, Ed.)AFRIKA FOCUS, 21(1), 45–64.
Vancouver
1.
Van Damme P, Termote C. African botanical heritage for new crop development. De Smedt J, editor. AFRIKA FOCUS. 2008;21(1):45–64.
MLA
Van Damme, Patrick, and Céline Termote. “African Botanical Heritage for New Crop Development.” Ed. Johan De Smedt. AFRIKA FOCUS 21.1 (2008): 45–64. Print.