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Journey to crime of 'itinerant crime groups'

Stijn Van Daele UGent and Tom Vander Beken UGent (2010) POLICING-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF POLICE STRATEGIES & MANAGEMENT. 33(2). p.339-353
abstract
Purpose - Most researchers have found that property crimes have a local focus: offenders tend to operate in the vicinity of their residence. This has led the police to organise themselves to concentrate their resources in highly populated, urban areas, Over the last decade mobile property offenders have been found in various Western European countries that differ from this norm. These groups of mainly Eastern European multiple offenders engaging in property crime tend to travel further than other offenders. As such, their operations differ from most criminals, challenging the way the police are organised and undermining criminological theories on journey to crime. The aim of this paper is to look at the specificity of mobility patterns of these groups, to examine the precise interpretation of their mobility and to consider the implications. Design/methodology/approach - The paper uses the Belgian police database containing all serious property crimes in Belgium for the period 2002-2006. Some basic offender characteristics have been identified and for these offenders journey-to-crime patterns have been established. Findings - Eastern European multiple offending groups tend to commit their crimes in rural areas. Although they start their journey in regions considered "crime importing", they carry out their crimes in "crime exporting" areas. As such, they are atypical, challenging traditional theories on journey-to-crime and the way in which police forces are organised. Research limitations/implications - Observing a special group is one thing, but explaining these differences is another. Further research is needed, in particular with regard to the motivational aspects for these offenders. Originality/value - Whereas most researchers have found crime (including property crime) to be mainly local, the present research focuses on more mobile offenders. The challenges that these groups create for law enforcement authorities make it important for them and their patterns of activity to be understood.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
OFFENDERS, PATTERNS, ROBBERIES, MOBILITY, DISTANCE DECAY, CHOICE, Crime research, Criminals, Behaviour
journal title
POLICING-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF POLICE STRATEGIES & MANAGEMENT
Policing-An Int J Police Strategies & Manag.
volume
33
issue
2
pages
339 - 353
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000280499900009
JCR category
CRIMINOLOGY & PENOLOGY
JCR impact factor
0.453 (2010)
JCR rank
34/43 (2010)
JCR quartile
4 (2010)
ISSN
1363-951X
DOI
10.1108/13639511011044920
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
845728
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-845728
date created
2010-01-29 11:41:39
date last changed
2011-07-08 13:42:17
@article{845728,
  abstract     = {Purpose - Most researchers have found that property crimes have a local focus: offenders tend to operate in the vicinity of their residence. This has led the police to organise themselves to concentrate their resources in highly populated, urban areas, Over the last decade mobile property offenders have been found in various Western European countries that differ from this norm. These groups of mainly Eastern European multiple offenders engaging in property crime tend to travel further than other offenders. As such, their operations differ from most criminals, challenging the way the police are organised and undermining criminological theories on journey to crime. The aim of this paper is to look at the specificity of mobility patterns of these groups, to examine the precise interpretation of their mobility and to consider the implications. Design/methodology/approach - The paper uses the Belgian police database containing all serious property crimes in Belgium for the period 2002-2006. Some basic offender characteristics have been identified and for these offenders journey-to-crime patterns have been established. Findings - Eastern European multiple offending groups tend to commit their crimes in rural areas. Although they start their journey in regions considered {\textacutedbl}crime importing{\textacutedbl}, they carry out their crimes in {\textacutedbl}crime exporting{\textacutedbl} areas. As such, they are atypical, challenging traditional theories on journey-to-crime and the way in which police forces are organised. Research limitations/implications - Observing a special group is one thing, but explaining these differences is another. Further research is needed, in particular with regard to the motivational aspects for these offenders. Originality/value - Whereas most researchers have found crime (including property crime) to be mainly local, the present research focuses on more mobile offenders. The challenges that these groups create for law enforcement authorities make it important for them and their patterns of activity to be understood.},
  author       = {Van Daele, Stijn and Vander Beken, Tom},
  issn         = {1363-951X},
  journal      = {POLICING-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF POLICE STRATEGIES \& MANAGEMENT},
  keyword      = {OFFENDERS,PATTERNS,ROBBERIES,MOBILITY,DISTANCE DECAY,CHOICE,Crime research,Criminals,Behaviour},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {339--353},
  title        = {Journey to crime of 'itinerant crime groups'},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/13639511011044920},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Van Daele, Stijn, and Tom Vander Beken. 2010. “Journey to Crime of ‘Itinerant Crime Groups’.” Policing-an International Journal of Police Strategies & Management 33 (2): 339–353.
APA
Van Daele, Stijn, & Vander Beken, T. (2010). Journey to crime of “itinerant crime groups.” POLICING-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF POLICE STRATEGIES & MANAGEMENT, 33(2), 339–353.
Vancouver
1.
Van Daele S, Vander Beken T. Journey to crime of “itinerant crime groups.”POLICING-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF POLICE STRATEGIES & MANAGEMENT. 2010;33(2):339–53.
MLA
Van Daele, Stijn, and Tom Vander Beken. “Journey to Crime of ‘Itinerant Crime Groups’.” POLICING-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF POLICE STRATEGIES & MANAGEMENT 33.2 (2010): 339–353. Print.