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Use of Routine MEG in the Primary Diagnostic Process of Epilepsy

AJ Colon, P Ossenblok, L Nieuwenhuis, KJ Stam and Paul Boon UGent (2009) JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. 26(5). p.326-332
abstract
At present, in epilepsy, magnetoencephalography (MEG) is mostly used for presurgical evaluations. It has proven to be robust for detecting and localizing interictal epileptiform discharges. Whether this is also true for first-line investigation in the diagnosis of epilepsy has not been investigated yet. We present our data on the usefulness of MEG in the earliest phase of diagnosing epilepsy. We examined 51 patients with suspicion of neocortical epilepsy and an inconclusive routine EEG. A method to integrate MEG in daily routine was developed. Results of visually assessed MEG recordings were compared, retrospectively, with clinical data and with the results of EEG after sleep deprivation. After a finding of inconclusive, routine MEG generated a gain in diagnostic value of 63% when compared with "final" clinical diagnosis. This is comparable with the added value of EEG after sleep deprivation recorded previously in the same patients. However, MEG is less of a burden for patient and hospital and has no association with risk of increase in seizure frequency. The routine MEG with visual assessment only is a reliable diagnostic tool in the routine diagnosis of epilepsy and may replace or precede EEG after sleep deprivation in daily clinical practice. Furthermore, MEG together with MRI enables magnetic source imaging and, thus, may provide additional information on the cortical localization of the epilepsy of a patient.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
keyword
DISCHARGES, SEIZURES, RECORDINGS, LOCALIZATION, MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAPHIC SPIKES, PARTIAL SLEEP-DEPRIVATION, LOBE EPILEPSY, EEG, ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY
journal title
JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
J. Clin. Neurophysiol.
volume
26
issue
5
pages
7 pages
publisher
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS
place of publication
PHILADELPHIA
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000270796800006
JCR category
CLINICAL NEUROLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.472 (2009)
JCR rank
108/165 (2009)
JCR quartile
3 (2009)
ISSN
0736-0258
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
829131
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-829131
date created
2010-01-18 09:43:15
date last changed
2010-01-22 13:30:08
@article{829131,
  abstract     = {At present, in epilepsy, magnetoencephalography (MEG) is mostly used for presurgical evaluations. It has proven to be robust for detecting and localizing interictal epileptiform discharges. Whether this is also true for first-line investigation in the diagnosis of epilepsy has not been investigated yet. We present our data on the usefulness of MEG in the earliest phase of diagnosing epilepsy. We examined 51 patients with suspicion of neocortical epilepsy and an inconclusive routine EEG. A method to integrate MEG in daily routine was developed. Results of visually assessed MEG recordings were compared, retrospectively, with clinical data and with the results of EEG after sleep deprivation. After a finding of inconclusive, routine MEG generated a gain in diagnostic value of 63\% when compared with {\textacutedbl}final{\textacutedbl} clinical diagnosis. This is comparable with the added value of EEG after sleep deprivation recorded previously in the same patients. However, MEG is less of a burden for patient and hospital and has no association with risk of increase in seizure frequency. The routine MEG with visual assessment only is a reliable diagnostic tool in the routine diagnosis of epilepsy and may replace or precede EEG after sleep deprivation in daily clinical practice. Furthermore, MEG together with MRI enables magnetic source imaging and, thus, may provide additional information on the cortical localization of the epilepsy of a patient.},
  author       = {Colon, AJ and Ossenblok, P and Nieuwenhuis, L and Stam, KJ and Boon, Paul},
  issn         = {0736-0258},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {DISCHARGES,SEIZURES,RECORDINGS,LOCALIZATION,MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAPHIC SPIKES,PARTIAL SLEEP-DEPRIVATION,LOBE EPILEPSY,EEG,ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {326--332},
  publisher    = {LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS \& WILKINS},
  title        = {Use of Routine MEG in the Primary Diagnostic Process of Epilepsy},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Colon, AJ, P Ossenblok, L Nieuwenhuis, KJ Stam, and Paul Boon. 2009. “Use of Routine MEG in the Primary Diagnostic Process of Epilepsy.” Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology 26 (5): 326–332.
APA
Colon, A., Ossenblok, P., Nieuwenhuis, L., Stam, K., & Boon, P. (2009). Use of Routine MEG in the Primary Diagnostic Process of Epilepsy. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY, 26(5), 326–332.
Vancouver
1.
Colon A, Ossenblok P, Nieuwenhuis L, Stam K, Boon P. Use of Routine MEG in the Primary Diagnostic Process of Epilepsy. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. PHILADELPHIA: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS; 2009;26(5):326–32.
MLA
Colon, AJ, P Ossenblok, L Nieuwenhuis, et al. “Use of Routine MEG in the Primary Diagnostic Process of Epilepsy.” JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY 26.5 (2009): 326–332. Print.