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Long-term population dynamics of Prunus serotina in natural forests on sandy soils

Margot Vanhellemont (UGent) , Kris Verheyen (UGent) and Martin Hermy (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Prunus serotina, a North-American tree species, is widely considered an aggressive invasive species in Western Europe. Opposite to prior studies, which focused mostly on areas heavily invaded by P. serotina, we studied long-term (70 years) forest development in two forest reserves in areas with a low propagule pressure: the forest reserves Liedekerke (Belgium) and Ossenbos (the Netherlands). Based on cadastral maps and aerial photographs, tree ring analysis, forest inventories and regeneration data, we reconstructed the invasion process. Long-distance dispersal events and windows of opportunity triggered the invasion of P. serotina, while further colonization was directed by connectivity to seed sources and light availability. The presence of native shrub species, the quick canopy closure, and the recalcitrant herb layer hampered further P. serotina establishment. Conversely, high herbivore pressure was found to favour P. serotina above native species, which resulted in P. serotina dominance. The outcome of the P. serotina invasion process contrasted sharply between the two studied forests: P. serotina was omnipresent and very abundant in the Ossenbos, while the species did not act as an aggressive invader in the Liedekerke forest reserve. Thus, formulating differentiated management approaches conditional upon the characteristics of the recipient ecosystem seems to be imperative.

Citation

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MLA
Vanhellemont, Margot, Kris Verheyen, and Martin Hermy. “Long-term Population Dynamics of Prunus Serotina in Natural Forests on Sandy Soils.” European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts. 2009. 44–44. Print.
APA
Vanhellemont, M., Verheyen, K., & Hermy, M. (2009). Long-term population dynamics of Prunus serotina in natural forests on sandy soils. European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts (pp. 44–44). Presented at the 2nd European Congress of Conservation Biology (ECCB 2009) : Conservation biology and beyond : from science to practice.
Chicago author-date
Vanhellemont, Margot, Kris Verheyen, and Martin Hermy. 2009. “Long-term Population Dynamics of Prunus Serotina in Natural Forests on Sandy Soils.” In European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts, 44–44.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanhellemont, Margot, Kris Verheyen, and Martin Hermy. 2009. “Long-term Population Dynamics of Prunus Serotina in Natural Forests on Sandy Soils.” In European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts, 44–44.
Vancouver
1.
Vanhellemont M, Verheyen K, Hermy M. Long-term population dynamics of Prunus serotina in natural forests on sandy soils. European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts. 2009. p. 44–44.
IEEE
[1]
M. Vanhellemont, K. Verheyen, and M. Hermy, “Long-term population dynamics of Prunus serotina in natural forests on sandy soils,” in European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts, Prague, Czech Republic, 2009, pp. 44–44.
@inproceedings{824398,
  abstract     = {{Prunus serotina, a North-American tree species, is widely considered an aggressive invasive species in Western Europe.  Opposite to prior studies, which focused mostly on areas heavily invaded by P. serotina, we studied long-term (70 years) forest development in two forest reserves in areas with a low propagule pressure: the forest reserves Liedekerke (Belgium) and Ossenbos (the Netherlands). Based on cadastral maps and aerial photographs, tree ring analysis, forest inventories and regeneration data, we reconstructed the invasion process.  Long-distance dispersal events and windows of opportunity triggered the invasion of P. serotina, while further colonization was directed by connectivity to seed sources and light availability. The presence of native shrub species, the quick canopy closure, and the recalcitrant herb layer hampered further P. serotina establishment. Conversely, high herbivore pressure was found to favour P. serotina above native species, which resulted in P. serotina dominance.  The outcome of the P. serotina invasion process contrasted sharply between the two studied forests: P. serotina was omnipresent and very abundant in the Ossenbos, while the species did not act as an aggressive invader in the Liedekerke forest reserve. Thus, formulating differentiated management approaches conditional upon the characteristics of the recipient ecosystem seems to be imperative.}},
  author       = {{Vanhellemont, Margot and Verheyen, Kris and Hermy, Martin}},
  booktitle    = {{European Congress of Conservation Biology, 2nd, Abstracts}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Prague, Czech Republic}},
  pages        = {{44--44}},
  title        = {{Long-term population dynamics of Prunus serotina in natural forests on sandy soils}},
  year         = {{2009}},
}