Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Time to abandon Internet Addiction? Predicting problematic internet, game, and social media use from psychosocial well-being and application use

Tony van Rooij, Christopher J Ferguson, Dike Van de Mheen and Tim Michaël Schoenmakers (2017) CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHIATRY. 14(1). p.113-121
abstract
Objective. There have long been indications that those with problems controlling their internet use manifest those problems in relation to specific applications. The current study empirically explores the option of abandoning a unified approach to problematic ‘internet use’, by splitting the concept into more specific application level measurement. Method. The current study used self-report survey data, collected from Dutch adolescents (aged 12-15, N=3945). Two Structural Equation Models predicted either problematic internet use (model 1) or both problematic game use and problematic social media use (model 2). Problematic use of the internet/games/social media was assessed with three abbreviated 6-item versions of the CIUS. Predictors included computer-activity use type in hours per week, depressive mood, loneliness, social anxiety, negative self-esteem, and general life-satisfaction. Results. Problematic internet use was associated with both social and gaming activities, as well as depressive mood. In the split model, problematic social media use was associated with three types of social, internet behavior (social networking, Twitter, and instant messenger) and depressive mood, while problematic gaming was associated with both online (internet) and offline gaming, as well as by gender (male) and depressive mood. Conclusions. The more specific problematic social media use and problematic game use measures provide a less ambiguous and clearer picture that also reveals the role of gender within problematic game use. This provides some evidence to support splitting up measures of problematic internet use into more specific measures in the future.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
problematic social media use, problematic game use, depression, addiction, Problematic internet use
journal title
CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHIATRY
volume
14
issue
1
pages
113 - 121
ISSN
1724-4935
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
additional info
Manuscript in press, pre-print attached.
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
8198559
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8198559
date created
2016-11-30 10:17:19
date last changed
2017-02-28 10:20:28
@article{8198559,
  abstract     = {Objective. There have long been indications that those with problems controlling their internet use manifest those problems in relation to specific applications. The current study empirically explores the option of abandoning a unified approach to problematic {\textquoteleft}internet use{\textquoteright}, by splitting the concept into more specific application level measurement. Method. The current study used self-report survey data, collected from Dutch adolescents (aged 12-15, N=3945). Two Structural Equation Models predicted either problematic internet use (model 1) or both problematic game use and problematic social media use (model 2). Problematic use of the internet/games/social media was assessed with three abbreviated 6-item versions of the CIUS. Predictors included computer-activity use type in hours per week, depressive mood, loneliness, social anxiety, negative self-esteem, and general life-satisfaction. Results. Problematic internet use was associated with both social and gaming activities, as well as depressive mood. In the split model, problematic social media use was associated with three types of social, internet behavior (social networking, Twitter, and instant messenger) and depressive mood, while problematic gaming was associated with both online (internet) and offline gaming, as well as by gender (male) and depressive mood. Conclusions. The more specific problematic social media use and problematic game use measures provide a less ambiguous and clearer picture that also reveals the role of gender within problematic game use. This provides some evidence to support splitting up measures of problematic internet use into more specific measures in the future.},
  author       = {van Rooij, Tony and Ferguson, Christopher J and Van de Mheen, Dike and Schoenmakers, Tim Micha{\"e}l},
  issn         = {1724-4935},
  journal      = {CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHIATRY},
  keyword      = {problematic social media use,problematic game use,depression,addiction,Problematic internet use},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {113--121},
  title        = {Time to abandon Internet Addiction? Predicting problematic internet, game, and social media use from psychosocial well-being and application use},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
van Rooij, Tony, Christopher J Ferguson, Dike Van de Mheen, and Tim Michaël Schoenmakers. 2017. “Time to Abandon Internet Addiction? Predicting Problematic Internet, Game, and Social Media Use from Psychosocial Well-being and Application Use.” Clinical Neuropsychiatry 14 (1): 113–121.
APA
van Rooij, T., Ferguson, C. J., Van de Mheen, D., & Schoenmakers, T. M. (2017). Time to abandon Internet Addiction? Predicting problematic internet, game, and social media use from psychosocial well-being and application use. CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHIATRY, 14(1), 113–121.
Vancouver
1.
van Rooij T, Ferguson CJ, Van de Mheen D, Schoenmakers TM. Time to abandon Internet Addiction? Predicting problematic internet, game, and social media use from psychosocial well-being and application use. CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHIATRY. 2017;14(1):113–21.
MLA
van Rooij, Tony, Christopher J Ferguson, Dike Van de Mheen, et al. “Time to Abandon Internet Addiction? Predicting Problematic Internet, Game, and Social Media Use from Psychosocial Well-being and Application Use.” CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHIATRY 14.1 (2017): 113–121. Print.