Advanced search
Add to list

Do children behave differently with a social robot if with peers?

Author
Organization
Abstract
Having robots interact socially with children is an increasingly relevant goal. We conducted a study with 7-8 year-olds looking at how single and pairs of children interacted with an autonomously acting robot in the context of a collaborative game. A preliminary examination of the interactions reveals a notable difference in how the robot is viewed: in one-on-one interactions with a robot, children appear to be more forgiving of failures in robot social contingencies; however, these deficiencies are not tolerated to the same extent in multi-party interactions.

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Baxter, P, J de Greeff, and Tony Belpaeme. “Do Children Behave Differently with a Social Robot If with Peers?” Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence. Vol. 8239. BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, 2013. 567–568. Print.
APA
Baxter, P, de Greeff, J., & Belpaeme, T. (2013). Do children behave differently with a social robot if with peers? Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence (Vol. 8239, pp. 567–568). Presented at the 5th International Conference on Social Robotics (ICSR), BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN.
Chicago author-date
Baxter, P, J de Greeff, and Tony Belpaeme. 2013. “Do Children Behave Differently with a Social Robot If with Peers?” In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, 8239:567–568. BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Baxter, P, J de Greeff, and Tony Belpaeme. 2013. “Do Children Behave Differently with a Social Robot If with Peers?” In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, 8239:567–568. BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN.
Vancouver
1.
Baxter P, de Greeff J, Belpaeme T. Do children behave differently with a social robot if with peers? Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence. BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN; 2013. p. 567–8.
IEEE
[1]
P. Baxter, J. de Greeff, and T. Belpaeme, “Do children behave differently with a social robot if with peers?,” in Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Bristol, ENGLAND, 2013, vol. 8239, pp. 567–568.
@inproceedings{8197719,
  abstract     = {Having robots interact socially with children is an increasingly relevant goal. We conducted a study with 7-8 year-olds looking at how single and pairs of children interacted with an autonomously acting robot in the context of a collaborative game. A preliminary examination of the interactions reveals a notable difference in how the robot is viewed: in one-on-one interactions with a robot, children appear to be more forgiving of failures in robot social contingencies; however, these deficiencies are not tolerated to the same extent in multi-party interactions.},
  author       = {Baxter, P and de Greeff, J and Belpaeme, Tony},
  booktitle    = {Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence},
  isbn         = {978-3-319-02674-9},
  issn         = {0302-9743},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Bristol, ENGLAND},
  pages        = {567--568},
  publisher    = {SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN},
  title        = {Do children behave differently with a social robot if with peers?},
  volume       = {8239},
  year         = {2013},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: