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Socially contingent humanoid robot head behaviour results in increased charity donations

Author
Organization
Abstract
The role of robot social behaviour in changing people's behaviour is an interesting and yet still open question, with the general assumption that social behaviour is beneficial. In this study, we examine the effect of socially contingent robot behaviours on a charity collection task. Manipulating only behavioural cues (maintaining the same verbal content), we show that when the robot exhibits contingent behaviours consistent with those observable in humans, this results in a 32% increase in money collected over a non-reactive robot. These results suggest that apparent social agency on the part of the robot, even when subtle behavioural cues are used, can result in behavioural change on the part of the interacting human.
Keywords
GAZE, EYES, FIELD EXPERIMENT, Charity, Experimental, Robot behavior design, Quantitative field study

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Wills, P et al. “Socially Contingent Humanoid Robot Head Behaviour Results in Increased Charity Donations.” ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. NEW YORK: IEEE, 2016. 533–534. Print.
APA
Wills, P., Baxter, P., Kennedy, J., Senft, E., & Belpaeme, T. (2016). Socially contingent humanoid robot head behaviour results in increased charity donations. ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (pp. 533–534). Presented at the 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), NEW YORK: IEEE.
Chicago author-date
Wills, P, P Baxter, J Kennedy, E Senft, and Tony Belpaeme. 2016. “Socially Contingent Humanoid Robot Head Behaviour Results in Increased Charity Donations.” In ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, 533–534. NEW YORK: IEEE.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Wills, P, P Baxter, J Kennedy, E Senft, and Tony Belpaeme. 2016. “Socially Contingent Humanoid Robot Head Behaviour Results in Increased Charity Donations.” In ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, 533–534. NEW YORK: IEEE.
Vancouver
1.
Wills P, Baxter P, Kennedy J, Senft E, Belpaeme T. Socially contingent humanoid robot head behaviour results in increased charity donations. ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. NEW YORK: IEEE; 2016. p. 533–4.
IEEE
[1]
P. Wills, P. Baxter, J. Kennedy, E. Senft, and T. Belpaeme, “Socially contingent humanoid robot head behaviour results in increased charity donations,” in ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, Christchurch, NEW ZEALAND, 2016, pp. 533–534.
@inproceedings{8197591,
  abstract     = {The role of robot social behaviour in changing people's behaviour is an interesting and yet still open question, with the general assumption that social behaviour is beneficial. In this study, we examine the effect of socially contingent robot behaviours on a charity collection task. Manipulating only behavioural cues (maintaining the same verbal content), we show that when the robot exhibits contingent behaviours consistent with those observable in humans, this results in a 32% increase in money collected over a non-reactive robot. These results suggest that apparent social agency on the part of the robot, even when subtle behavioural cues are used, can result in behavioural change on the part of the interacting human.},
  author       = {Wills, P and Baxter, P and Kennedy, J and Senft, E and Belpaeme, Tony},
  booktitle    = {ACMIEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction},
  isbn         = {978-1-4673-8370-7},
  issn         = {2167-2121},
  keywords     = {GAZE,EYES,FIELD EXPERIMENT,Charity,Experimental,Robot behavior design,Quantitative field study},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Christchurch, NEW ZEALAND},
  pages        = {533--534},
  publisher    = {IEEE},
  title        = {Socially contingent humanoid robot head behaviour results in increased charity donations},
  year         = {2016},
}

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