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From famine to food crisis: what history can teach us about local and global subsistence crises

Eric Vanhaute (UGent)
(2011) JOURNAL OF PEASANT STUDIES. 38(1). p.47-65
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Abstract
The number of famine prone regions in the world has been shrinking for centuries. It is currently mainly limited to sub-Saharan Africa. Yet the impact of endemic hunger has not declined and the early twenty-first century seems to be faced with a new threat: global subsistence crises. In this essay I question the concepts of famine and food crisis from different analytical angles: historical and contemporary famine research, food regime theory, and peasant studies. I will argue that only a more integrated historical framework of analysis can surpass dualistic interpretations grounded in Eurocentric modernization paradigms. This article successively debates historical and contemporary famine research, the contemporary food regime and the new global food crisis, the lessons from Europe's 'grand escape' from hunger, and the peasantry and 'depeasantization' as central analytical concepts. Dualistic histories of food and famine have been dominating developmentalist stories for too long. This essay shows how a blending of historical and contemporary famine research, food regime theory and new peasant studies can foster a more integrated perspective.
Keywords
AGRICULTURE, MORTALITY, PATTERNS, PEASANT, famines, global food crisis, peasantries

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MLA
Vanhaute, Eric. “From Famine to Food Crisis: What History Can Teach Us About Local and Global Subsistence Crises.” JOURNAL OF PEASANT STUDIES 38.1 (2011): 47–65. Print.
APA
Vanhaute, E. (2011). From famine to food crisis: what history can teach us about local and global subsistence crises. JOURNAL OF PEASANT STUDIES, 38(1), 47–65.
Chicago author-date
Vanhaute, Eric. 2011. “From Famine to Food Crisis: What History Can Teach Us About Local and Global Subsistence Crises.” Journal of Peasant Studies 38 (1): 47–65.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vanhaute, Eric. 2011. “From Famine to Food Crisis: What History Can Teach Us About Local and Global Subsistence Crises.” Journal of Peasant Studies 38 (1): 47–65.
Vancouver
1.
Vanhaute E. From famine to food crisis: what history can teach us about local and global subsistence crises. JOURNAL OF PEASANT STUDIES. 2011;38(1):47–65.
IEEE
[1]
E. Vanhaute, “From famine to food crisis: what history can teach us about local and global subsistence crises,” JOURNAL OF PEASANT STUDIES, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 47–65, 2011.
@article{817448,
  abstract     = {The number of famine prone regions in the world has been shrinking for centuries. It is currently mainly limited to sub-Saharan Africa. Yet the impact of endemic hunger has not declined and the early twenty-first century seems to be faced with a new threat: global subsistence crises. In this essay I question the concepts of famine and food crisis from different analytical angles: historical and contemporary famine research, food regime theory, and peasant studies. I will argue that only a more integrated historical framework of analysis can surpass dualistic interpretations grounded in Eurocentric modernization paradigms. This article successively debates historical and contemporary famine research, the contemporary food regime and the new global food crisis, the lessons from Europe's 'grand escape' from hunger, and the peasantry and 'depeasantization' as central analytical concepts. Dualistic histories of food and famine have been dominating developmentalist stories for too long. This essay shows how a blending of historical and contemporary famine research, food regime theory and new peasant studies can foster a more integrated perspective.},
  author       = {Vanhaute, Eric},
  issn         = {0306-6150},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF PEASANT STUDIES},
  keywords     = {AGRICULTURE,MORTALITY,PATTERNS,PEASANT,famines,global food crisis,peasantries},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {47--65},
  title        = {From famine to food crisis: what history can teach us about local and global subsistence crises},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03066150.2010.538580},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2011},
}

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