Advanced search
1 file | 683.08 KB Add to list

Social anxiety-linked attention bias to threat is indirectly related to post-event processing via subjective emotional reactivity to social stress

(2016) BEHAVIOR THERAPY. 47(3). p.377-387
Author
Organization
Abstract
Attention bias to threat (e.g., disgust faces) is a cognitive vulnerability factor for social anxiety occurring in early stages of information processing. Few studies have investigated the relationship between social anxiety and attention biases, in conjunction with emotional and cognitive responses to a social stressor. Elucidating these links would shed light on maintenance factors of social anxiety and could help identify malleable treatment targets. This study examined the associations between social anxiety level, attention bias to disgust (AB-disgust), subjective emotional and physiological reactivity to a social stressor, and subsequent post-event processing (PEP). We tested a mediational model where social anxiety level indirectly predicted subsequent PEP via its association with AB disgust and immediate subjective emotional reactivity to social stress. Fifty-five undergraduates (45% female) completed a passive viewing task. Eye movements were tracked during the presentation of social stimuli (e.g., disgust faces) and used to calculate AB-disgust. Next, participants gave an impromptu speech in front of a video camera and watched a neutral video, followed by the completion of a PEP measure. Although there was no association between AB-disgust and physiological reactivity to the stressor, AB-disgust was significantly associated with greater subjective emotional reactivity from baseline to the speech. Analyses supported a partial mediation model where AB-disgust and subjective emotional reactivity to a social stressor partially accounted for the link between social anxiety levels and PEP.
Keywords
PHOBIA, RUMINATION, ANXIOUS INDIVIDUALS, EYE-TRACKING, DISORDER, DISENGAGEMENT, DEPRESSION, RECOVERY, TASK, social anxiety, attention bias, post-event processing, disgust, emotional reactivity

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 683.08 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Cek, D, Alvaro Sanchez Lopez, and KR Timpano. “Social Anxiety-linked Attention Bias to Threat Is Indirectly Related to Post-event Processing via Subjective Emotional Reactivity to Social Stress.” BEHAVIOR THERAPY 47.3 (2016): 377–387. Print.
APA
Cek, D., Sanchez Lopez, A., & Timpano, K. (2016). Social anxiety-linked attention bias to threat is indirectly related to post-event processing via subjective emotional reactivity to social stress. BEHAVIOR THERAPY, 47(3), 377–387.
Chicago author-date
Cek, D, Alvaro Sanchez Lopez, and KR Timpano. 2016. “Social Anxiety-linked Attention Bias to Threat Is Indirectly Related to Post-event Processing via Subjective Emotional Reactivity to Social Stress.” Behavior Therapy 47 (3): 377–387.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Cek, D, Alvaro Sanchez Lopez, and KR Timpano. 2016. “Social Anxiety-linked Attention Bias to Threat Is Indirectly Related to Post-event Processing via Subjective Emotional Reactivity to Social Stress.” Behavior Therapy 47 (3): 377–387.
Vancouver
1.
Cek D, Sanchez Lopez A, Timpano K. Social anxiety-linked attention bias to threat is indirectly related to post-event processing via subjective emotional reactivity to social stress. BEHAVIOR THERAPY. NEW YORK: ASSOC ADV BEHAVIOR THERAPY; 2016;47(3):377–87.
IEEE
[1]
D. Cek, A. Sanchez Lopez, and K. Timpano, “Social anxiety-linked attention bias to threat is indirectly related to post-event processing via subjective emotional reactivity to social stress,” BEHAVIOR THERAPY, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 377–387, 2016.
@article{8168663,
  abstract     = {Attention bias to threat (e.g., disgust faces) is a cognitive vulnerability factor for social anxiety occurring in early stages of information processing. Few studies have investigated the relationship between social anxiety and attention biases, in conjunction with emotional and cognitive responses to a social stressor. Elucidating these links would shed light on maintenance factors of social anxiety and could help identify malleable treatment targets. This study examined the associations between social anxiety level, attention bias to disgust (AB-disgust), subjective emotional and physiological reactivity to a social stressor, and subsequent post-event processing (PEP). We tested a mediational model where social anxiety level indirectly predicted subsequent PEP via its association with AB disgust and immediate subjective emotional reactivity to social stress. Fifty-five undergraduates (45% female) completed a passive viewing task. Eye movements were tracked during the presentation of social stimuli (e.g., disgust faces) and used to calculate AB-disgust. Next, participants gave an impromptu speech in front of a video camera and watched a neutral video, followed by the completion of a PEP measure. Although there was no association between AB-disgust and physiological reactivity to the stressor, AB-disgust was significantly associated with greater subjective emotional reactivity from baseline to the speech. Analyses supported a partial mediation model where AB-disgust and subjective emotional reactivity to a social stressor partially accounted for the link between social anxiety levels and PEP.},
  author       = {Cek, D and Sanchez Lopez, Alvaro and Timpano, KR},
  issn         = {0005-7894},
  journal      = {BEHAVIOR THERAPY},
  keywords     = {PHOBIA,RUMINATION,ANXIOUS INDIVIDUALS,EYE-TRACKING,DISORDER,DISENGAGEMENT,DEPRESSION,RECOVERY,TASK,social anxiety,attention bias,post-event processing,disgust,emotional reactivity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {377--387},
  publisher    = {ASSOC ADV BEHAVIOR THERAPY},
  title        = {Social anxiety-linked attention bias to threat is indirectly related to post-event processing via subjective emotional reactivity to social stress},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2016},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: