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There are limits to the effects of task instructions : making the automatic effects of task instructions context-specific takes practice

Senne Braem UGent, Baptist Liefooghe UGent, Jan De Houwer UGent, Marcel Brass UGent and Elger Abrahamse UGent (2017) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. 43(3). p.394-403
abstract
Unlike other animals, humans have the unique ability to share and use verbal instructions to prepare for upcoming tasks. Recent research showed that instructions are sufficient for the automatic, reflex-like activation of responses. However, systematic studies into the limits of these automatic effects of task instructions remain relatively scarce. In this study, the authors set out to investigate whether this instruction-based automatic activation of responses can be context-dependent. Specifically, participants performed a task of which the stimulus-response rules and context (location on the screen) could either coincide or not with those of an instructed to-be-performed task (whose instructions changed every run). In 2 experiments, the authors showed that the instructed task rules had an automatic impact on performance-performance was slowed down when the merely instructed task rules did not coincide, but, importantly, this effect was not context-dependent. Interestingly, a third and fourth experiment suggests that context dependency can actually be observed, but only when practicing the task in its appropriate context for over 60 trials or after a sufficient amount of practice on a fixed context (the context was the same for all instructed tasks). Together, these findings seem to suggest that instructions can establish stimulus-response representations that have a reflexive impact on behavior but are insensitive to the context in which the task is known to be valid. Instead, context-specific task representations seem to require practice.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION
volume
43
issue
3
pages
394 - 403
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000396001100005
ISSN
0278-7393
DOI
10.1037/xlm0000310
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
8164031
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8164031
date created
2016-11-22 18:15:31
date last changed
2017-08-29 07:37:21
@article{8164031,
  abstract     = {Unlike other animals, humans have the unique ability to share and use verbal instructions to prepare for upcoming tasks. Recent research showed that instructions are sufficient for the automatic, reflex-like activation of responses. However, systematic studies into the limits of these automatic effects of task instructions remain relatively scarce. In this study, the authors set out to investigate whether this instruction-based automatic activation of responses can be context-dependent. Specifically, participants performed a task of which the stimulus-response rules and context (location on the screen) could either coincide or not with those of an instructed to-be-performed task (whose instructions changed every run). In 2 experiments, the authors showed that the instructed task rules had an automatic impact on performance-performance was slowed down when the merely instructed task rules did not coincide, but, importantly, this effect was not context-dependent. Interestingly, a third and fourth experiment suggests that context dependency can actually be observed, but only when practicing the task in its appropriate context for over 60 trials or after a sufficient amount of practice on a fixed context (the context was the same for all instructed tasks). Together, these findings seem to suggest that instructions can establish stimulus-response representations that have a reflexive impact on behavior but are insensitive to the context in which the task is known to be valid. Instead, context-specific task representations seem to require practice.},
  author       = {Braem, Senne and Liefooghe, Baptist and De Houwer, Jan and Brass, Marcel and Abrahamse, Elger},
  issn         = {0278-7393 },
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {394--403},
  title        = {There are limits to the effects of task instructions : making the automatic effects of task instructions context-specific takes practice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000310},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Braem, Senne, Baptist Liefooghe, Jan De Houwer, Marcel Brass, and Elger Abrahamse. 2017. “There Are Limits to the Effects of Task Instructions : Making the Automatic Effects of Task Instructions Context-specific Takes Practice.” Journal of Experimental Psychology-learning Memory and Cognition 43 (3): 394–403.
APA
Braem, S., Liefooghe, B., De Houwer, J., Brass, M., & Abrahamse, E. (2017). There are limits to the effects of task instructions : making the automatic effects of task instructions context-specific takes practice. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 43(3), 394–403.
Vancouver
1.
Braem S, Liefooghe B, De Houwer J, Brass M, Abrahamse E. There are limits to the effects of task instructions : making the automatic effects of task instructions context-specific takes practice. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. 2017;43(3):394–403.
MLA
Braem, Senne, Baptist Liefooghe, Jan De Houwer, et al. “There Are Limits to the Effects of Task Instructions : Making the Automatic Effects of Task Instructions Context-specific Takes Practice.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION 43.3 (2017): 394–403. Print.