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A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 °C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal

Emilie Courtens, Eva Spieck, Ramiro Vilchez Vargas, Samuel Bodé UGent, Pascal Boeckx UGent, Stefan Schouten, Ruy Jauregui, Dietmar H Pieper, Siegfried Vlaeminck UGent and Nico Boon UGent (2016) ISME JOURNAL. 10(9). p.2293-2303
abstract
The increasing production of nitrogen-containing fertilizers is crucial to meet the global food demand, yet high losses of reactive nitrogen associated with the food production/consumption chain progressively deteriorate the natural environment. Currently, mesophilic nitrogen-removing microbes eliminate nitrogen from wastewaters. Although thermophilic nitrifiers have been separately enriched from natural environments, no bioreactors are described that couple these processes for the treatment of nitrogen in hot wastewaters. Samples from composting facilities were used as inoculum for the batch-wise enrichment of thermophilic nitrifiers (350 days). Subsequently, the enrichments were transferred to a bioreactor to obtain a stable, high-rate nitrifying process (560 days). The community contained up to 17% ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOAs) closely related to 'Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis', and 25% nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOBs) related to Nitrospira calida. Incorporation of C-13-derived bicarbonate into the respective characteristic membrane lipids during nitrification supported their activity as autotrophs. Specific activities up to 198 +/- 10 and 894 +/- 81 mg N g(-1) VSS per day for AOAs and NOBs were measured, where NOBs were 33% more sensitive to free ammonia. The NOBs were extremely sensitive to free nitrous acid, whereas the AOAs could only be inhibited by high nitrite concentrations, independent of the free nitrous acid concentration. The observed difference in product/substrate inhibition could facilitate the development of NOB inhibition strategies to achieve more cost-effective processes such as deammonification. This study describes the enrichment of autotrophic thermophilic nitrifiers from a nutrient-rich environment and the successful operation of a thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor for the first time, facilitating opportunities for thermophilic nitrogen removal biotechnology.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
alternative title
A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 degrees C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INDUSTRIAL WASTE-WATER, NITRITE-OXIDIZING BACTERIUM, MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, AMMONIA, NITRIFICATION, ARCHAEA, GROWTH, CULTIVATION, ABUNDANCE, REVEALS
journal title
ISME JOURNAL
ISME J.
volume
10
issue
9
pages
2293 - 2303
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000386664600019
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
9.664 (2016)
JCR rank
3/153 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
1751-7362
DOI
10.1038/ismej.2016.8
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
additional info
the last two authors contributed equally and are both senior authors for this work
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8163432
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8163432
date created
2016-11-22 15:33:09
date last changed
2017-06-07 09:52:41
@article{8163432,
  abstract     = {The increasing production of nitrogen-containing fertilizers is crucial to meet the global food demand, yet high losses of reactive nitrogen associated with the food production/consumption chain progressively deteriorate the natural environment. Currently, mesophilic nitrogen-removing microbes eliminate nitrogen from wastewaters. Although thermophilic nitrifiers have been separately enriched from natural environments, no bioreactors are described that couple these processes for the treatment of nitrogen in hot wastewaters. Samples from composting facilities were used as inoculum for the batch-wise enrichment of thermophilic nitrifiers (350 days). Subsequently, the enrichments were transferred to a bioreactor to obtain a stable, high-rate nitrifying process (560 days). The community contained up to 17\% ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOAs) closely related to 'Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis', and 25\% nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOBs) related to Nitrospira calida. Incorporation of C-13-derived bicarbonate into the respective characteristic membrane lipids during nitrification supported their activity as autotrophs. Specific activities up to 198 +/- 10 and 894 +/- 81 mg N g(-1) VSS per day for AOAs and NOBs were measured, where NOBs were 33\% more sensitive to free ammonia. The NOBs were extremely sensitive to free nitrous acid, whereas the AOAs could only be inhibited by high nitrite concentrations, independent of the free nitrous acid concentration. The observed difference in product/substrate inhibition could facilitate the development of NOB inhibition strategies to achieve more cost-effective processes such as deammonification. This study describes the enrichment of autotrophic thermophilic nitrifiers from a nutrient-rich environment and the successful operation of a thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor for the first time, facilitating opportunities for thermophilic nitrogen removal biotechnology.},
  author       = {Courtens, Emilie and Spieck, Eva and Vilchez Vargas, Ramiro and Bod{\'e}, Samuel and Boeckx, Pascal and Schouten, Stefan and Jauregui, Ruy and Pieper, Dietmar H and Vlaeminck, Siegfried and Boon, Nico},
  issn         = {1751-7362},
  journal      = {ISME JOURNAL},
  keyword      = {INDUSTRIAL WASTE-WATER,NITRITE-OXIDIZING BACTERIUM,MICROBIAL COMMUNITY,AMMONIA,NITRIFICATION,ARCHAEA,GROWTH,CULTIVATION,ABUNDANCE,REVEALS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2293--2303},
  title        = {A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 {\textdegree}C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2016.8},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Courtens, Emilie, Eva Spieck, Ramiro Vilchez Vargas, Samuel Bodé, Pascal Boeckx, Stefan Schouten, Ruy Jauregui, Dietmar H Pieper, Siegfried Vlaeminck, and Nico Boon. 2016. “A Robust Nitrifying Community in a Bioreactor at 50 °C Opens up the Path for Thermophilic Nitrogen Removal.” Isme Journal 10 (9): 2293–2303.
APA
Courtens, E., Spieck, E., Vilchez Vargas, R., Bodé, S., Boeckx, P., Schouten, S., Jauregui, R., et al. (2016). A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 °C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal. ISME JOURNAL, 10(9), 2293–2303.
Vancouver
1.
Courtens E, Spieck E, Vilchez Vargas R, Bodé S, Boeckx P, Schouten S, et al. A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 °C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal. ISME JOURNAL. 2016;10(9):2293–303.
MLA
Courtens, Emilie, Eva Spieck, Ramiro Vilchez Vargas, et al. “A Robust Nitrifying Community in a Bioreactor at 50 °C Opens up the Path for Thermophilic Nitrogen Removal.” ISME JOURNAL 10.9 (2016): 2293–2303. Print.