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Conversion of solid waste to diesel via catalytic pressureless depolymerization: pilot scale production and detailed compositional characterization

Arturo González Quiroga (UGent) , Marko Dokic (UGent) , Kevin Van Geem (UGent) and Guy Marin (UGent)
(2016) ENERGY & FUELS. 30(10). p.8292-8303
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Abstract
Solid waste is considered as one of the key feedstocks for the chemical industry to stimulate the world's transition toward a circular economy. Therefore, a novel production process, catalytic pressureless depolymerization (CPD), for conversion of waste to high-energy density liquid fuel has been studied. More specifically, the organic fractions recovered from demolition waste and municipal solid waste were liquefied and deoxygenated in a CPD pilot plant with 150 L h(-1)(4.2 X 10(-5) m(3) s(-1).) liquid fuel capacity. The produced fuels were characterized by elemental analysis, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC X GC), and the ISO tests for automotive diesel established by the EN 590:2009 Standard. The studied fuels showed very low oxygen contents (<0.4 wt %) and a high share of paraffins (>40 wt %). The carbon range of the fuel obtained from demolition wood was wider than that of the fuel obtained from municipal solid waste (C-5-C-29 vs. C-6-C-22). The flash points (54, 46 degrees C), the sulfur contents (40, 80 ppmw), and the cetane numbers (43, 33) did not comply with the respective requirements for automotive diesel (i.e., >= 55 degrees C, <10 ppmw, and >= 51). Nevertheless, both fuels showed salient cold filter plugging points (-14, -15 degrees C) and cloud points (-15,-44 degrees C), which are indicative of good fuel performance at extreme winter conditions. The wide carbon number distribution, especially toward the lower range (i.e., carbon number < C,,), suggests that the studied fuels can be split into a kerosene-like and a diesel-like cut. Overall, the fuels from the CPD process exhibit great potential as alternative transportation fuel; however, selecting the starting material is crucial for minimizing costly hydrotreating.
Keywords
DIRECT DEOXY-LIQUEFACTION, 2-DIMENSIONAL GAS-CHROMATOGRAPHY, FAST PYROLYSIS, HYDROCARBON OIL, INTEGRATED HYDROPYROLYSIS, BLENDING COMPONENTS, RESIDENCE TIME, VEGETABLE-OIL, BIO-OILS, BIOMASS

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Chicago
González Quiroga, Arturo, Marko Dokic, Kevin Van Geem, and Guy Marin. 2016. “Conversion of Solid Waste to Diesel via Catalytic Pressureless Depolymerization: Pilot Scale Production and Detailed Compositional Characterization.” Energy & Fuels 30 (10): 8292–8303.
APA
González Quiroga, A., Dokic, M., Van Geem, K., & Marin, G. (2016). Conversion of solid waste to diesel via catalytic pressureless depolymerization: pilot scale production and detailed compositional characterization. ENERGY & FUELS, 30(10), 8292–8303.
Vancouver
1.
González Quiroga A, Dokic M, Van Geem K, Marin G. Conversion of solid waste to diesel via catalytic pressureless depolymerization: pilot scale production and detailed compositional characterization. ENERGY & FUELS. 2016;30(10):8292–303.
MLA
González Quiroga, Arturo et al. “Conversion of Solid Waste to Diesel via Catalytic Pressureless Depolymerization: Pilot Scale Production and Detailed Compositional Characterization.” ENERGY & FUELS 30.10 (2016): 8292–8303. Print.
@article{8154366,
  abstract     = {Solid waste is considered as one of the key feedstocks for the chemical industry to stimulate the world's transition toward a circular economy. Therefore, a novel production process, catalytic pressureless depolymerization (CPD), for conversion of waste to high-energy density liquid fuel has been studied. More specifically, the organic fractions recovered from demolition waste and municipal solid waste were liquefied and deoxygenated in a CPD pilot plant with 150 L h(-1)(4.2 X 10(-5) m(3) s(-1).) liquid fuel capacity. The produced fuels were characterized by elemental analysis, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC X GC), and the ISO tests for automotive diesel established by the EN 590:2009 Standard. The studied fuels showed very low oxygen contents (<0.4 wt %) and a high share of paraffins (>40 wt %). The carbon range of the fuel obtained from demolition wood was wider than that of the fuel obtained from municipal solid waste (C-5-C-29 vs. C-6-C-22). The flash points (54, 46 degrees C), the sulfur contents (40, 80 ppmw), and the cetane numbers (43, 33) did not comply with the respective requirements for automotive diesel (i.e., >= 55 degrees C, <10 ppmw, and >= 51). Nevertheless, both fuels showed salient cold filter plugging points (-14, -15 degrees C) and cloud points (-15,-44 degrees C), which are indicative of good fuel performance at extreme winter conditions. The wide carbon number distribution, especially toward the lower range (i.e., carbon number < C,,), suggests that the studied fuels can be split into a kerosene-like and a diesel-like cut. Overall, the fuels from the CPD process exhibit great potential as alternative transportation fuel; however, selecting the starting material is crucial for minimizing costly hydrotreating.},
  author       = {González Quiroga, Arturo and Dokic, Marko and Van Geem, Kevin and Marin, Guy},
  issn         = {0887-0624},
  journal      = {ENERGY & FUELS},
  keywords     = {DIRECT DEOXY-LIQUEFACTION,2-DIMENSIONAL GAS-CHROMATOGRAPHY,FAST PYROLYSIS,HYDROCARBON OIL,INTEGRATED HYDROPYROLYSIS,BLENDING COMPONENTS,RESIDENCE TIME,VEGETABLE-OIL,BIO-OILS,BIOMASS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {8292--8303},
  title        = {Conversion of solid waste to diesel via catalytic pressureless depolymerization: pilot scale production and detailed compositional characterization},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b01639},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2016},
}

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