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In vitro investigation of six antioxidants for pig diets

(2016) ANTIOXIDANTS. 5(4).
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Abstract
Oxidative stress in the small intestinal epithelium can lead to barrier malfunction. In this study, the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA), quercetin (Que), gallic acid (GA), lipoic acid (LA), ethoxyquin (ETQ) and Se-methionine (SeMet) pre-treatments using 2 mM Trolox as a control on the viability and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) of oxidatively (H2O2) stressed intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) was investigated. A neutral red assay showed that RA (50-400 mu M), Que (12.5-200 mu M), GA (50-400 mu M), ETQ (6.25-100 mu M), and SeMet (125-1000 mu M) pre-treatments but not LA significantly increased the viability of H2O2-stressed IPEC-J2 cells (p < 0.05). A 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H(2)DCFDA) fluorescent probe showed that RA (100-600 mu M), Que (25-800 mu M), ETQ (3.125-100 mu M) and SeMet (500-2000 mu M) pre-treatments significantly reduced iROS in IPEC-J2 monolayers (p < 0.05). Moreover, RA and Que were most effective in reducing iROS. Therefore, the effects of RA and Que on barrier functioning in vitro were examined. RA and Que pre-treatments significantly decreased fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran-4 (4 kDa) permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of an IPEC-J2 cell monolayer (p < 0.05). These in vitro results of RA and Que hold promise for their use as antioxidants in pig feed.
Keywords
antioxidant pre-treatment, hydrogen peroxide, IPEC-J2 cells, small intestinal epithelial permeability, oxidative stress, HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE, OXIDATIVE STRESS, ROSMARINIC ACID, GALLIC ACID, MAJOR MICROBIOTA, EPITHELIAL-CELLS, BARRIER FUNCTION, REDOX STATUS, CACO-2, FLAVONOIDS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Vergauwen, Hans et al. “In Vitro Investigation of Six Antioxidants for Pig Diets.” ANTIOXIDANTS 5.4 (2016): n. pag. Print.
APA
Vergauwen, H., Prims, S., Degroote, J., Wang, W., Casteleyn, C., van Cruchten, S., De Smet, S., et al. (2016). In vitro investigation of six antioxidants for pig diets. ANTIOXIDANTS, 5(4).
Chicago author-date
Vergauwen, Hans, Sara Prims, Jeroen Degroote, Wei Wang, Christophe Casteleyn, Steven van Cruchten, Stefaan De Smet, Joris Michiels, and Chris van Ginneken. 2016. “In Vitro Investigation of Six Antioxidants for Pig Diets.” Antioxidants 5 (4).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vergauwen, Hans, Sara Prims, Jeroen Degroote, Wei Wang, Christophe Casteleyn, Steven van Cruchten, Stefaan De Smet, Joris Michiels, and Chris van Ginneken. 2016. “In Vitro Investigation of Six Antioxidants for Pig Diets.” Antioxidants 5 (4).
Vancouver
1.
Vergauwen H, Prims S, Degroote J, Wang W, Casteleyn C, van Cruchten S, et al. In vitro investigation of six antioxidants for pig diets. ANTIOXIDANTS. 2016;5(4).
IEEE
[1]
H. Vergauwen et al., “In vitro investigation of six antioxidants for pig diets,” ANTIOXIDANTS, vol. 5, no. 4, 2016.
@article{8150179,
  abstract     = {Oxidative stress in the small intestinal epithelium can lead to barrier malfunction. In this study, the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA), quercetin (Que), gallic acid (GA), lipoic acid (LA), ethoxyquin (ETQ) and Se-methionine (SeMet) pre-treatments using 2 mM Trolox as a control on the viability and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) of oxidatively (H2O2) stressed intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) was investigated. A neutral red assay showed that RA (50-400 mu M), Que (12.5-200 mu M), GA (50-400 mu M), ETQ (6.25-100 mu M), and SeMet (125-1000 mu M) pre-treatments but not LA significantly increased the viability of H2O2-stressed IPEC-J2 cells (p < 0.05). A 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H(2)DCFDA) fluorescent probe showed that RA (100-600 mu M), Que (25-800 mu M), ETQ (3.125-100 mu M) and SeMet (500-2000 mu M) pre-treatments significantly reduced iROS in IPEC-J2 monolayers (p < 0.05). Moreover, RA and Que were most effective in reducing iROS. Therefore, the effects of RA and Que on barrier functioning in vitro were examined. RA and Que pre-treatments significantly decreased fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran-4 (4 kDa) permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of an IPEC-J2 cell monolayer (p < 0.05). These in vitro results of RA and Que hold promise for their use as antioxidants in pig feed.},
  articleno    = {41},
  author       = {Vergauwen, Hans and Prims, Sara and Degroote, Jeroen and Wang, Wei and Casteleyn, Christophe and van Cruchten, Steven and De Smet, Stefaan and Michiels, Joris and van Ginneken, Chris},
  issn         = {2076-3921},
  journal      = {ANTIOXIDANTS},
  keywords     = {antioxidant pre-treatment,hydrogen peroxide,IPEC-J2 cells,small intestinal epithelial permeability,oxidative stress,HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE,OXIDATIVE STRESS,ROSMARINIC ACID,GALLIC ACID,MAJOR MICROBIOTA,EPITHELIAL-CELLS,BARRIER FUNCTION,REDOX STATUS,CACO-2,FLAVONOIDS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {14},
  title        = {In vitro investigation of six antioxidants for pig diets},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antiox5040041},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2016},
}

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