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Grain legumes and human health

Fernand Lambein UGent, Yu-Haey Kuo UGent, Fumio Ikegami, Kuniko Kusama-Eguchi and Dirk Enneking (2009) Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture. 1. p.422-432
abstract
Since early civilisation in different continents, grain legumes have been a part of balanced diets together with cereals. In general the seeds from those two plant families give together a good source of essential amino acids and may have given an evolutionary advantage. A sustainable diet for vegetarians may not be possible without the protein-rich legumes. Consumed alone, legumes can be a mixed blessing because of their deficiency of some essential amino acids. This deficiency can be balanced in a varied diet containing components richer in tryptophan and the sulphur amino acid methionine and cysteine. Many legume species are exceptionally rich in secondary metabolites, some of which are beneficial to human health while without adequate processing through heating or leaching many can be detrimental to the health of the consumer. Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most popular and also one of the more healthy species. The presence of genistein and other isoflavones makes it famous as an anti-cancer nutraceutical. Isoflavones and other phytoestrogens, occurring mainly in legumes, might be a factor promoting longevity. Other beneficial secondary metabolites are found among the non-protein amino acids. Legumes are very rich in an enormous variety of non-protein amino acids that can be beneficial or toxic. A beneficial non-protein amino acid occurs in high concentration in fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum), a component of curry, while a variety of toxic amino acids occurs in the genera Lathyrus and Vicia. Legume seeds also contain a variety of anti-nutritional factors that can be reduced by post-harvest processing such as fermentation or germination. Fermentation also improves the balance of essential amino acids. Numerous dietary products such as soy sauce or tempeh are traditional food ingredients derived from legumes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture
editor
M.C. Kharkwal
volume
1
pages
11 pages
publisher
Indian Society of Genetics and Plant Breeding
place of publication
New Delhi, India
conference name
Fourth International Food Legumes Research Conference (IFLRC-IV)
conference location
New Delhi, India
conference start
2005-10-18
conference end
2005-10-22
ISBN
978-81-908995-1-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
814220
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-814220
date created
2009-12-18 11:32:58
date last changed
2009-12-18 13:21:28
@inproceedings{814220,
  abstract     = {Since early civilisation in different continents, grain legumes have been a part of balanced diets together with cereals. In general the seeds from those two plant families give together a good source of essential amino acids and may have given an evolutionary advantage. A sustainable diet for vegetarians may not be possible without the protein-rich legumes. Consumed alone, legumes can be a mixed blessing because of their deficiency of some essential amino acids. This deficiency can be balanced in a varied diet containing components richer in tryptophan and the sulphur amino acid methionine and cysteine. Many legume species are exceptionally rich in secondary metabolites, some of which are beneficial to human health while without adequate processing through heating or leaching many can be detrimental to the health of the consumer. Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most popular and also one of the more healthy species. The presence of genistein and other isoflavones makes it famous as an anti-cancer nutraceutical. Isoflavones and other phytoestrogens, occurring mainly in legumes, might be a factor promoting longevity. Other beneficial secondary metabolites are found among the non-protein amino acids. Legumes are very rich in an enormous variety of non-protein amino acids that can be beneficial or toxic. A beneficial non-protein amino acid occurs in high concentration in fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum), a component of curry, while a variety of toxic amino acids occurs in the genera Lathyrus and Vicia. Legume seeds also contain a variety of anti-nutritional factors that can be reduced by post-harvest processing such as fermentation or germination. Fermentation also improves the balance of essential amino acids. Numerous dietary products such as soy sauce or tempeh are traditional food ingredients derived from legumes.},
  author       = {Lambein, Fernand and Kuo, Yu-Haey and Ikegami, Fumio and Kusama-Eguchi, Kuniko and Enneking, Dirk},
  booktitle    = {Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture},
  editor       = {Kharkwal, M.C.},
  isbn         = {978-81-908995-1-2},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {New Delhi, India},
  pages        = {422--432},
  publisher    = {Indian Society of Genetics and Plant Breeding},
  title        = {Grain legumes and human health},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Lambein, Fernand, Yu-Haey Kuo, Fumio Ikegami, Kuniko Kusama-Eguchi, and Dirk Enneking. 2009. “Grain Legumes and Human Health.” In Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture, ed. M.C. Kharkwal, 1:422–432. New Delhi, India: Indian Society of Genetics and Plant Breeding.
APA
Lambein, F., Kuo, Y.-H., Ikegami, F., Kusama-Eguchi, K., & Enneking, D. (2009). Grain legumes and human health. In M. C. Kharkwal (Ed.), Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture (Vol. 1, pp. 422–432). Presented at the Fourth International Food Legumes Research Conference (IFLRC-IV), New Delhi, India: Indian Society of Genetics and Plant Breeding.
Vancouver
1.
Lambein F, Kuo Y-H, Ikegami F, Kusama-Eguchi K, Enneking D. Grain legumes and human health. In: Kharkwal MC, editor. Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture. New Delhi, India: Indian Society of Genetics and Plant Breeding; 2009. p. 422–32.
MLA
Lambein, Fernand, Yu-Haey Kuo, Fumio Ikegami, et al. “Grain Legumes and Human Health.” Food Legumes for Nutritional Security and Sustainable Agriculture. Ed. M.C. Kharkwal. Vol. 1. New Delhi, India: Indian Society of Genetics and Plant Breeding, 2009. 422–432. Print.