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Abstract
The humerus is primarily affected in approximately 10 % of patients by primary bone tumors. Furthermore, the proximal humerus is a preferred location of metastatic invasion for breast carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. Limb salvage surgery is indicated for these patients if a functional limb remains after tumor resection and if the patient’s general condition permits surgery. For the shoulder, the majority of resections involve a type I or V according to Malawer’s classification. Restoration of shoulder function after proximal humeral resection for oncological reasons is still a challenge. In most oncological cases, resection of the rotator cuff is necessary to obtain eradication of the tumor. For these patients, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can provide durable midterm function. The location of the tumor determines whether a reversed arthroplasty in combination with a transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscle can be used to overcome the problem of insufficient external rotation strength after rotator cuff resection.
Keywords
Reversed arthroplasty, Tumor, Resection, Location, Tendon attachment

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Sys, Gwen, Alexander Van Tongel, and Lieven De Wilde. 2016. “Proximal Humerus Tumors.” In Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty : Biomechanics, Clinical Techniques, and Current Technologies, ed. Mark Frankle, Scott Marberry, and Derek Pupello, 257–264. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.
APA
Sys, G., Van Tongel, A., & De Wilde, L. (2016). Proximal humerus tumors. In Mark Frankle, S. Marberry, & D. Pupello (Eds.), Reverse shoulder arthroplasty : biomechanics, clinical techniques, and current technologies (pp. 257–264). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.
Vancouver
1.
Sys G, Van Tongel A, De Wilde L. Proximal humerus tumors. In: Frankle M, Marberry S, Pupello D, editors. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty : biomechanics, clinical techniques, and current technologies. Cham, Switzerland: Springer; 2016. p. 257–64.
MLA
Sys, Gwen, Alexander Van Tongel, and Lieven De Wilde. “Proximal Humerus Tumors.” Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty : Biomechanics, Clinical Techniques, and Current Technologies. Ed. Mark Frankle, Scott Marberry, & Derek Pupello. Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2016. 257–264. Print.
@incollection{8135985,
  abstract     = {The humerus is primarily affected in approximately 10 \% of patients by primary bone tumors. Furthermore, the proximal humerus is a preferred location of metastatic invasion for breast carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. Limb salvage surgery is indicated for these patients if a functional limb remains after tumor resection and if the patient{\textquoteright}s general condition permits surgery. For the shoulder, the majority of resections involve a type I or V according to Malawer{\textquoteright}s classification. Restoration of shoulder function after proximal humeral resection for oncological reasons is still a challenge. In most oncological cases, resection of the rotator cuff is necessary to obtain eradication of the tumor. For these patients, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can provide durable midterm function. The location of the tumor determines whether a reversed arthroplasty in combination with a transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscle can be used to overcome the problem of insufficient external rotation strength after rotator cuff resection.},
  author       = {Sys, Gwen and Van Tongel, Alexander and De Wilde, Lieven},
  booktitle    = {Reverse shoulder arthroplasty : biomechanics, clinical techniques, and current technologies},
  editor       = {Frankle, Mark and Marberry, Scott and Pupello, Derek},
  isbn         = {9783319208404},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {257--264},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Proximal humerus tumors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20840-4\_25},
  year         = {2016},
}

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