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Who shares what with whom and why? News sharing profiles amongst Flemish news users

(2016) DIGITAL JOURNALISM. 4(7). p.921-932
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Abstract
Successful online publishers like BuzzFeed and the Huffington Post have mastered the art of making news go viral. In order for this to happen, it needs to be shared by a large number of online media users. Understanding what makes a piece of content worth sharing with others then becomes a key element in understanding current news flows. User-oriented studies about what incites people to share news are limited. Content characteristics, personal dispositions towards news and new media, and self-presentation have proved to be relevant indicators, but people might differ considerably in the way they share news. We hypothesize that different “sharing profiles” are discernible amongst online news users, based on their motivations to share, but also considering internet skills and news-sharing behaviour. In order to identify these profiles, we draw on a survey amongst Dutch-speaking Belgian online media users (N = 1237). The results illustrate how motivations to share are important predictors of online sharing activity; especially staying socially connected with others. Yet, self-confidence in internet skills was found to be a second, important predictor for online sharing behaviour. Drawing on these insights, we discuss whether viral news forms a threat or an opportunity to news reporting.

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Chicago
Picone, Ike, Ralf De Wolf, and Sarie Robijt. 2016. “Who Shares What with Whom and Why? News Sharing Profiles Amongst Flemish News Users.” Digital Journalism 4 (7): 921–932.
APA
Picone, I., De Wolf, R., & Robijt, S. (2016). Who shares what with whom and why? News sharing profiles amongst Flemish news users. DIGITAL JOURNALISM, 4(7), 921–932.
Vancouver
1.
Picone I, De Wolf R, Robijt S. Who shares what with whom and why? News sharing profiles amongst Flemish news users. DIGITAL JOURNALISM. 2016;4(7):921–32.
MLA
Picone, Ike, Ralf De Wolf, and Sarie Robijt. “Who Shares What with Whom and Why? News Sharing Profiles Amongst Flemish News Users.” DIGITAL JOURNALISM 4.7 (2016): 921–932. Print.
@article{8134895,
  abstract     = {Successful online publishers like BuzzFeed and the Huffington Post have mastered the art of making news go viral. In order for this to happen, it needs to be shared by a large number of online media users. Understanding what makes a piece of content worth sharing with others then becomes a key element in understanding current news flows. User-oriented studies about what incites people to share news are limited. Content characteristics, personal dispositions towards news and new media, and self-presentation have proved to be relevant indicators, but people might differ considerably in the way they share news. We hypothesize that different {\textquotedblleft}sharing profiles{\textquotedblright} are discernible amongst online news users, based on their motivations to share, but also considering internet skills and news-sharing behaviour. In order to identify these profiles, we draw on a survey amongst Dutch-speaking Belgian online media users (N = 1237). The results illustrate how motivations to share are important predictors of online sharing activity; especially staying socially connected with others. Yet, self-confidence in internet skills was found to be a second, important predictor for online sharing behaviour. Drawing on these insights, we discuss whether viral news forms a threat or an opportunity to news reporting.},
  author       = {Picone, Ike and De Wolf, Ralf and Robijt, Sarie },
  issn         = {2167-0811},
  journal      = {DIGITAL JOURNALISM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {921--932},
  title        = {Who shares what with whom and why? News sharing profiles amongst Flemish news users},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2016.1168708},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2016},
}

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