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Coadministration of a plasmid encoding HIV-1 Gag enhances the efficacy of cancer DNA vaccines

(2016) MOLECULAR THERAPY. 24(9). p.1686-1696
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Abstract
DNA vaccination holds great promise for the prevention and treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. However, the clinical ability of DNA vaccines is still controversial due to the limited immune response initially observed in humans. We hypothesized that electroporation of a plasmid encoding the HIV-1 Gag viral capsid protein would enhance cancer DNA vaccine potency. DNA electroporation used to deliver plasmids in vivo, induced type I interferons, thereby supporting the activation of innate immunity. The coadministration of ovalbumin (OVA) and HIV-1 Gag encoding plasmids modulated the adaptive immune response. This strategy favored antigen-specific Th1 immunity, delayed B16F10-OVA tumor growth and improved mouse survival in both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination approaches. Similarly, a prophylactic DNA immunization against the melanoma-associated antigen gp100 was enhanced by the codelivery of the HIV-1 Gag plasmid. The adjuvant effect was not driven by the formation of HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles. This work highlights the ability of both electroporation and the HIV-1 Gag plasmid to stimulate innate immunity for enhancing cancer DNA vaccine immunogenicity and demonstrates interesting tracks for the design of new translational genetic adjuvants to overcome the current limitations of DNA vaccines in humans.
Keywords
DENDRITIC CELLS, ELECTROPORATION, IMMUNE-RESPONSES, GENETIC ADJUVANTS, DELIVERY, INNATE, VACCINATION, PARTICLES, ACTIVATION, MELANOMA

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MLA
Lambricht, Laure et al. “Coadministration of a Plasmid Encoding HIV-1 Gag Enhances the Efficacy of Cancer DNA Vaccines.” MOLECULAR THERAPY 24.9 (2016): 1686–1696. Print.
APA
Lambricht, L., Vanvarenberg, K., De Beuckelaer, A., Van Hoecke, L., Grooten, J., Ucakar, B., Lipnik, P., et al. (2016). Coadministration of a plasmid encoding HIV-1 Gag enhances the efficacy of cancer DNA vaccines. MOLECULAR THERAPY, 24(9), 1686–1696.
Chicago author-date
Lambricht, Laure, Kevin Vanvarenberg, Ans De Beuckelaer, Lien Van Hoecke, Johan Grooten, Bernard Ucakar, Pascale Lipnik, et al. 2016. “Coadministration of a Plasmid Encoding HIV-1 Gag Enhances the Efficacy of Cancer DNA Vaccines.” Molecular Therapy 24 (9): 1686–1696.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lambricht, Laure, Kevin Vanvarenberg, Ans De Beuckelaer, Lien Van Hoecke, Johan Grooten, Bernard Ucakar, Pascale Lipnik, Niek Sanders, Stefan Lienenklaus, Véronique Préat, and Gaëlle Vandermeulen. 2016. “Coadministration of a Plasmid Encoding HIV-1 Gag Enhances the Efficacy of Cancer DNA Vaccines.” Molecular Therapy 24 (9): 1686–1696.
Vancouver
1.
Lambricht L, Vanvarenberg K, De Beuckelaer A, Van Hoecke L, Grooten J, Ucakar B, et al. Coadministration of a plasmid encoding HIV-1 Gag enhances the efficacy of cancer DNA vaccines. MOLECULAR THERAPY. 2016;24(9):1686–96.
IEEE
[1]
L. Lambricht et al., “Coadministration of a plasmid encoding HIV-1 Gag enhances the efficacy of cancer DNA vaccines,” MOLECULAR THERAPY, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 1686–1696, 2016.
@article{8132712,
  abstract     = {{DNA vaccination holds great promise for the prevention and treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. However, the clinical ability of DNA vaccines is still controversial due to the limited immune response initially observed in humans. We hypothesized that electroporation of a plasmid encoding the HIV-1 Gag viral capsid protein would enhance cancer DNA vaccine potency. DNA electroporation used to deliver plasmids in vivo, induced type I interferons, thereby supporting the activation of innate immunity. The coadministration of ovalbumin (OVA) and HIV-1 Gag encoding plasmids modulated the adaptive immune response. This strategy favored antigen-specific Th1 immunity, delayed B16F10-OVA tumor growth and improved mouse survival in both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination approaches. Similarly, a prophylactic DNA immunization against the melanoma-associated antigen gp100 was enhanced by the codelivery of the HIV-1 Gag plasmid. The adjuvant effect was not driven by the formation of HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles. This work highlights the ability of both electroporation and the HIV-1 Gag plasmid to stimulate innate immunity for enhancing cancer DNA vaccine immunogenicity and demonstrates interesting tracks for the design of new translational genetic adjuvants to overcome the current limitations of DNA vaccines in humans.}},
  author       = {{Lambricht, Laure and Vanvarenberg, Kevin and De Beuckelaer, Ans and Van Hoecke, Lien and Grooten, Johan and Ucakar, Bernard and Lipnik, Pascale and Sanders, Niek and Lienenklaus, Stefan and Préat, Véronique and Vandermeulen, Gaëlle}},
  issn         = {{1525-0016}},
  journal      = {{MOLECULAR THERAPY}},
  keywords     = {{DENDRITIC CELLS,ELECTROPORATION,IMMUNE-RESPONSES,GENETIC ADJUVANTS,DELIVERY,INNATE,VACCINATION,PARTICLES,ACTIVATION,MELANOMA}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{9}},
  pages        = {{1686--1696}},
  title        = {{Coadministration of a plasmid encoding HIV-1 Gag enhances the efficacy of cancer DNA vaccines}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mt.2016.122}},
  volume       = {{24}},
  year         = {{2016}},
}

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