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Abstract
Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising.
Keywords
portable Raman mapping system, archaeometry, data processing

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MLA
Lauwers, Debbie et al. “In Situ Raman Mapping of Art Objects.” Ed. Howell GM Edwards & Peter Vandenabeele. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES 374.2082 (2016): n. pag. Print.
APA
Lauwers, Debbie, Brondeel, P., Moens, L., & Vandenabeele, P. (2016). In situ Raman mapping of art objects. (H. G. Edwards & P. Vandenabeele, Eds.)PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES, 374(2082).
Chicago author-date
Lauwers, Debbie, Philip Brondeel, Luc Moens, and Peter Vandenabeele. 2016. “In Situ Raman Mapping of Art Objects.” Ed. Howell GM Edwards and Peter Vandenabeele. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A-mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 374 (2082).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lauwers, Debbie, Philip Brondeel, Luc Moens, and Peter Vandenabeele. 2016. “In Situ Raman Mapping of Art Objects.” Ed. Howell GM Edwards and Peter Vandenabeele. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A-mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 374 (2082).
Vancouver
1.
Lauwers D, Brondeel P, Moens L, Vandenabeele P. In situ Raman mapping of art objects. Edwards HG, Vandenabeele P, editors. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES. 2016;374(2082).
IEEE
[1]
D. Lauwers, P. Brondeel, L. Moens, and P. Vandenabeele, “In situ Raman mapping of art objects,” PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES, vol. 374, no. 2082, 2016.
@article{8132587,
  abstract     = {Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising.},
  articleno    = {20160039},
  author       = {Lauwers, Debbie and Brondeel, Philip and Moens, Luc and Vandenabeele, Peter},
  editor       = {Edwards, Howell GM and Vandenabeele, Peter},
  issn         = {1364-503X},
  journal      = {PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES},
  keywords     = {portable Raman mapping system,archaeometry,data processing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2082},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {In situ Raman mapping of art objects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2016.0039},
  volume       = {374},
  year         = {2016},
}

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