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Mediating effects of self-efficacy, benefits and barriers on the association between peer and parental factors and physical activity among adolescent girls with a lower educational level

Maïté Verloigne (UGent) , Greet Cardon (UGent) , Marieke De Craemer (UGent) , Sara D'Haese (UGent) and Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij (UGent)
(2016) PLOS ONE. 11(6).
Author
Organization
Abstract
Background : The prevalence of physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls is low, suggesting it is important to have insights into the complex processes that may underlie their physical activity levels. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediating effects of self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers on the associations between peer and parental variables and physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls. Methods : In total, 226 girls (mean age 16.0 +/- 1.0 years; 53% technical education; 47% vocational education) from a convenience sample of 6 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium, completed a questionnaire on their total physical activity level and related peer and parental variables (i.e. modeling of physical activity, co-participation in physical activities and encouragement to be active) and personal variables (i.e. self-efficacy to be active, and specific perceived benefits of physical activity and specific barriers to be active). Mediating effects were tested using MacKinnon's product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses. Results : Higher peer and parental modeling, co-participation and encouragement were significantly related to a higher physical activity level among adolescent girls (p<0.05). Self-efficacy, the perceived benefits of having fun, being around friends or meeting new people, and not being bored and the perceived barrier of not liking physical activity mediated several associations between peer and parental variables and girls' physical activity, with some of the mediated proportions exceeding 60%. Conclusions : This study contributed to a better understanding of the complexity of how parental and peer factors work together with personal factors to influence the physical activity levels of adolescent girls with a lower educational level. Interventions should involve both peers and parents, as they may influence girls' physical activity both directly and indirectly through the internalisation of several personal variables, such as self-efficacy to be active and the perceived benefit of having fun.
Keywords
FITNESS, PERCEPTIONS, PARTICIPATION, YOUTH, BEHAVIORS, HEALTH, PERCEIVED BARRIERS, FEMALE ADOLESCENTS, SOCIAL SUPPORT, SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

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Citation

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MLA
Verloigne, Maïté, Greet Cardon, Marieke De Craemer, et al. “Mediating Effects of Self-efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association Between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity Among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level.” PLOS ONE 11.6 (2016): n. pag. Print.
APA
Verloigne, M., Cardon, G., De Craemer, M., D’Haese, S., & De Bourdeaudhuij, I. (2016). Mediating effects of self-efficacy, benefits and barriers on the association between peer and parental factors and physical activity among adolescent girls with a lower educational level. PLOS ONE, 11(6).
Chicago author-date
Verloigne, Maïté, Greet Cardon, Marieke De Craemer, Sara D’Haese, and Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij. 2016. “Mediating Effects of Self-efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association Between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity Among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level.” Plos One 11 (6).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Verloigne, Maïté, Greet Cardon, Marieke De Craemer, Sara D’Haese, and Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij. 2016. “Mediating Effects of Self-efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association Between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity Among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level.” Plos One 11 (6).
Vancouver
1.
Verloigne M, Cardon G, De Craemer M, D’Haese S, De Bourdeaudhuij I. Mediating effects of self-efficacy, benefits and barriers on the association between peer and parental factors and physical activity among adolescent girls with a lower educational level. PLOS ONE. 2016;11(6).
IEEE
[1]
M. Verloigne, G. Cardon, M. De Craemer, S. D’Haese, and I. De Bourdeaudhuij, “Mediating effects of self-efficacy, benefits and barriers on the association between peer and parental factors and physical activity among adolescent girls with a lower educational level,” PLOS ONE, vol. 11, no. 6, 2016.
@article{8129041,
  abstract     = {Background : The prevalence of physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls is low, suggesting it is important to have insights into the complex processes that may underlie their physical activity levels. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediating effects of self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers on the associations between peer and parental variables and physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls. 
Methods : In total, 226 girls (mean age 16.0 +/- 1.0 years; 53% technical education; 47% vocational education) from a convenience sample of 6 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium, completed a questionnaire on their total physical activity level and related peer and parental variables (i.e. modeling of physical activity, co-participation in physical activities and encouragement to be active) and personal variables (i.e. self-efficacy to be active, and specific perceived benefits of physical activity and specific barriers to be active). Mediating effects were tested using MacKinnon's product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses. 
Results : Higher peer and parental modeling, co-participation and encouragement were significantly related to a higher physical activity level among adolescent girls (p<0.05). Self-efficacy, the perceived benefits of having fun, being around friends or meeting new people, and not being bored and the perceived barrier of not liking physical activity mediated several associations between peer and parental variables and girls' physical activity, with some of the mediated proportions exceeding 60%. 
Conclusions : This study contributed to a better understanding of the complexity of how parental and peer factors work together with personal factors to influence the physical activity levels of adolescent girls with a lower educational level. Interventions should involve both peers and parents, as they may influence girls' physical activity both directly and indirectly through the internalisation of several personal variables, such as self-efficacy to be active and the perceived benefit of having fun.},
  articleno    = {e0157216},
  author       = {Verloigne, Maïté and Cardon, Greet and De Craemer, Marieke and D'Haese, Sara and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keywords     = {FITNESS,PERCEPTIONS,PARTICIPATION,YOUTH,BEHAVIORS,HEALTH,PERCEIVED BARRIERS,FEMALE ADOLESCENTS,SOCIAL SUPPORT,SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {16},
  title        = {Mediating effects of self-efficacy, benefits and barriers on the association between peer and parental factors and physical activity among adolescent girls with a lower educational level},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157216},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}

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