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Accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation for suicide risk in therapy-resistant depressed patients : a randomized, sham-controlled trial

STEFANIE DESMYTER, Romain Duprat, Chris Baeken UGent, Sara Van Autreve, Kurt Audenaert UGent and Cornelis Van Heeringen UGent (2016) FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE. 10.
abstract
Objectives: We aimed to examine the effects and safety of accelerated intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS) on suicide risk in a group of treatment-resistant unipolar depressed patients, using an extensive suicide assessment scale. Methods: In 50 therapy-resistant, antidepressant-free depressed patients, an intensive protocol of accelerated iTBS was applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in a randomized, sham-controlled crossover design. Patients received 20 iTBS sessions over 4 days. Suicide risk was assessed using the Beck Scale of Suicide ideation (BSI). Results: The iTBS protocol was safe and well tolerated. We observed a significant decrease of the BSI score over time, unrelated to active or sham stimulation and unrelated to depression-response. No worsening of suicidal ideation was observed. The effects of accelerated iTBS on mood and depression severity are reported in Duprat et al. (2016). The decrease in suicide risk lasted up to 1 month after baseline, even in depression non-responders. Conclusions: This accelerated iTBS protocol was safe. The observed significant decrease in suicide risk was unrelated to active or sham stimulation and unrelated to depression response. Further sham-controlled research in suicidal depressed patients is necessary. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01832805).
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
depression, therapy-resistant depression, suicidal ideation, Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, suicide, theta burst stimulation, TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION, HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX, MAJOR DEPRESSION, ANTIDEPRESSANT EFFICACY, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, PLACEBO-RESPONSE, CLINICAL-TRIAL, METAANALYSIS, SAFETY, RTMS
journal title
FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE
Front. Hum. Neurosci.
volume
10
article number
480
pages
7 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000384152800001
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.209 (2016)
JCR rank
17/77 (2016)
JCR quartile
1 (2016)
ISSN
1662-5161
DOI
10.3389/fnhum.2016.00480
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
8125751
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8125751
date created
2016-10-25 10:01:25
date last changed
2017-05-17 09:44:40
@article{8125751,
  abstract     = {Objectives: We aimed to examine the effects and safety of accelerated intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS) on suicide risk in a group of treatment-resistant unipolar depressed patients, using an extensive suicide assessment scale. 
Methods: In 50 therapy-resistant, antidepressant-free depressed patients, an intensive protocol of accelerated iTBS was applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in a randomized, sham-controlled crossover design. Patients received 20 iTBS sessions over 4 days. Suicide risk was assessed using the Beck Scale of Suicide ideation (BSI). 
Results: The iTBS protocol was safe and well tolerated. We observed a significant decrease of the BSI score over time, unrelated to active or sham stimulation and unrelated to depression-response. No worsening of suicidal ideation was observed. The effects of accelerated iTBS on mood and depression severity are reported in Duprat et al. (2016). The decrease in suicide risk lasted up to 1 month after baseline, even in depression non-responders. 
Conclusions: This accelerated iTBS protocol was safe. The observed significant decrease in suicide risk was unrelated to active or sham stimulation and unrelated to depression response. Further sham-controlled research in suicidal depressed patients is necessary. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01832805).},
  articleno    = {480},
  author       = {DESMYTER, STEFANIE and Duprat, Romain and Baeken, Chris and Van Autreve, Sara and Audenaert, Kurt and Van Heeringen, Cornelis},
  issn         = {1662-5161},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {depression,therapy-resistant depression,suicidal ideation,Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation,suicide,theta burst stimulation,TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION,HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX,MAJOR DEPRESSION,ANTIDEPRESSANT EFFICACY,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,PLACEBO-RESPONSE,CLINICAL-TRIAL,METAANALYSIS,SAFETY,RTMS},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {7},
  title        = {Accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation for suicide risk in therapy-resistant depressed patients : a randomized, sham-controlled trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00480},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
DESMYTER, STEFANIE, Romain Duprat, Chris Baeken, Sara Van Autreve, Kurt Audenaert, and Cornelis Van Heeringen. 2016. “Accelerated Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for Suicide Risk in Therapy-resistant Depressed Patients : a Randomized, Sham-controlled Trial.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
APA
DESMYTER, STEFANIE, Duprat, R., Baeken, C., Van Autreve, S., Audenaert, K., & Van Heeringen, C. (2016). Accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation for suicide risk in therapy-resistant depressed patients : a randomized, sham-controlled trial. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 10.
Vancouver
1.
DESMYTER S, Duprat R, Baeken C, Van Autreve S, Audenaert K, Van Heeringen C. Accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation for suicide risk in therapy-resistant depressed patients : a randomized, sham-controlled trial. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE. 2016;10.
MLA
DESMYTER, STEFANIE, Romain Duprat, Chris Baeken, et al. “Accelerated Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation for Suicide Risk in Therapy-resistant Depressed Patients : a Randomized, Sham-controlled Trial.” FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE 10 (2016): n. pag. Print.