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Recently, there has been an increasing demand for high quality gluten-free breads wherein the application of proteins is a possible strategy. This research focused on the characteristics (moisture, ash, protein content, particle size distribution, water holding capacity (WHC) and solubility, oil binding capacity, gel forming and mulsifying capacity) of four alternative, non-allergen roteins (corn, pea, potato, rice) and their functionality (WHC, starch gelatinisation, frequency sweep, creep recovery, texture profile analysis) in three gluten free dough and bread systems (rice flour, wheat starch or corn/potato starch (1:3) with 14% protein substitution). Incorporation of proteins led to an increase in dough consistency, depending on the matrix and the nature of the protein. Pea protein increased the consistency of the dough based on the corn/potato starch blend or wheat starch. Corn or rice protein only increased dough consistency in the corn/potato starch system. The selected proteins had no elasticity promoting effect on gluten-free doughs. All proteins had a hardening effect on the corn/potato starch breads, while they had no effect on the hardness of rice flour system breads. In the wheat starch bread, pea and rice protein led to an increase in crumb hardness, while potato and corn starch significantly increased hardness. Proteins cause better crumb structure but have no volume increasing effect. In conclusion, the influence of proteins to gluten free dough and bread is clearly depending on the nature of the chosen starch/flour matrix and the protein. Optimal amounts of water and the addition of transglutaminase should lead to better results.
Keywords
vegetable protein, gluten-free, bread, pasting, water holding capacity

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Chicago
De Beleyr, Astrid, Delina Van Laere, Filip Van Bockstaele, Melissa Camerlinck, Ingrid De Leyn, Marianne De Meerleer, and Lieve Vermeiren. 2016. “Functionality of Vegetable Proteins in Gluten-free Dough and Bread.” In Gluten-Free Cereal Products and Beverages, 4th International Symposium, Abstracts.
APA
De Beleyr, A., Van Laere, D., Van Bockstaele, F., Camerlinck, M., De Leyn, I., De Meerleer, M., & Vermeiren, L. (2016). Functionality of vegetable proteins in gluten-free dough and bread. Gluten-Free Cereal Products and Beverages, 4th International symposium, Abstracts. Presented at the 4th International symposium on Gluten-Free Cereal Products and Beverages.
Vancouver
1.
De Beleyr A, Van Laere D, Van Bockstaele F, Camerlinck M, De Leyn I, De Meerleer M, et al. Functionality of vegetable proteins in gluten-free dough and bread. Gluten-Free Cereal Products and Beverages, 4th International symposium, Abstracts. 2016.
MLA
De Beleyr, Astrid, Delina Van Laere, Filip Van Bockstaele, et al. “Functionality of Vegetable Proteins in Gluten-free Dough and Bread.” Gluten-Free Cereal Products and Beverages, 4th International Symposium, Abstracts. 2016. Print.
@inproceedings{8124861,
  abstract     = {Recently, there has been an increasing demand for high quality gluten-free breads wherein the application of proteins is a possible strategy. This research focused on the characteristics (moisture, ash, protein content, particle size distribution, water holding capacity (WHC) and solubility, oil binding capacity, gel forming and mulsifying capacity) of four alternative, non-allergen roteins (corn, pea, potato, rice) and their functionality (WHC, starch gelatinisation, frequency sweep, creep recovery, texture profile analysis) in three gluten free dough and bread systems (rice flour, wheat starch or corn/potato starch (1:3) with 14\% protein substitution). Incorporation of proteins led to an increase in dough consistency, depending on the matrix and the nature of the protein. 
Pea protein increased the consistency of the dough based on the corn/potato starch blend or wheat starch. Corn or rice protein only increased dough consistency in the corn/potato starch system. The selected proteins had no elasticity promoting effect on gluten-free doughs. All proteins had a hardening effect on the corn/potato starch breads, while they had no effect on the hardness of rice flour system breads. In the wheat starch bread, pea and rice protein led to an increase in crumb hardness, while potato and corn starch significantly increased hardness. Proteins cause better crumb structure but have no volume increasing effect. In conclusion, the influence of proteins to gluten free dough and bread is clearly depending on the nature of the chosen starch/flour matrix and the protein. Optimal amounts of water and the addition of transglutaminase should lead to better results.},
  articleno    = {abstract P6-5},
  author       = {De Beleyr, Astrid and Van Laere, Delina  and Van Bockstaele, Filip and Camerlinck, Melissa and De Leyn, Ingrid and De Meerleer, Marianne and Vermeiren, Lieve},
  booktitle    = {Gluten-Free Cereal Products and Beverages, 4th International symposium, Abstracts},
  keyword      = {vegetable protein,gluten-free,bread,pasting,water holding capacity},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Cork, Ireland},
  title        = {Functionality of vegetable proteins in gluten-free dough and bread},
  year         = {2016},
}