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Biochemical and stress responses of rohu Labeo rohita and mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala in relation to acclimation temperatures

T Das, AK Pal, SK Chakraborty, SM Manush, RS Dalvi, SK Apte, NP Sahu and Sri Kartik Baruah UGent (2009) JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY. 74(7). p.1487-1498
abstract
The biochemical and stress responses of two Indian major carps, rohu Labeo rohita and mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala were studied after acclimating them to four preset temperatures (26, 31, 33 and 36 degrees C) for 30 days. The blood glucose and liver glycogen levels showed an inverse trend in both the species and were significantly different in L. rohita at higher temperatures. The decrease in the liver glycogen level of C. mrigala, however, was not significant. Plasma cortisol levels increased significantly whereas the ascorbic acid content in the brain and kidney of both the species decreased significantly with increasing temperatures. Total lipid content in the liver of both the species decreased significantly with increasing acclimation temperatures. The phospholipid concentration decreased in L. rohita with increasing acclimation temperatures, and in C. mrigala the values decreased up to 33 degrees C and increased at 36 degrees C. In C. mrigala, the cholesterol level decreased up to 33 degrees C and then increased at 36 degrees C, but the absolute value was lower in comparison to L. rohita. The cholesterol levels, however, were not significantly different in L. rohita. Triglycerides and free fatty acids concentrations decreased significantly with increasing acclimation temperatures in both the species. The present study indicates species-specific metabolic responses of L. rohita and C. mrigala to thermal acclimation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SALVELINUS-FONTINALIS, PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSE, STRIPED BASS, VITAMIN-C, METABOLIC-RESPONSES, glucose, lipid, thermal, CATLA-CATLA HAMILTON, ASCORBIC-ACID STATUS, OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION, carps, cortisol, THERMAL TOLERANCE, RAINBOW-TROUT, ascorbic acid
journal title
JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY
J. Fish Biol.
volume
74
issue
7
pages
1487 - 1498
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000265550600010
JCR category
FISHERIES
JCR impact factor
1.226 (2009)
JCR rank
22/42 (2009)
JCR quartile
3 (2009)
ISSN
0022-1112
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8649.2009.02216.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
812393
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-812393
date created
2009-12-16 10:45:12
date last changed
2010-01-12 10:45:24
@article{812393,
  abstract     = {The biochemical and stress responses of two Indian major carps, rohu Labeo rohita and mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala were studied after acclimating them to four preset temperatures (26, 31, 33 and 36 degrees C) for 30 days. The blood glucose and liver glycogen levels showed an inverse trend in both the species and were significantly different in L. rohita at higher temperatures. The decrease in the liver glycogen level of C. mrigala, however, was not significant. Plasma cortisol levels increased significantly whereas the ascorbic acid content in the brain and kidney of both the species decreased significantly with increasing temperatures. Total lipid content in the liver of both the species decreased significantly with increasing acclimation temperatures. The phospholipid concentration decreased in L. rohita with increasing acclimation temperatures, and in C. mrigala the values decreased up to 33 degrees C and increased at 36 degrees C. In C. mrigala, the cholesterol level decreased up to 33 degrees C and then increased at 36 degrees C, but the absolute value was lower in comparison to L. rohita. The cholesterol levels, however, were not significantly different in L. rohita. Triglycerides and free fatty acids concentrations decreased significantly with increasing acclimation temperatures in both the species. The present study indicates species-specific metabolic responses of L. rohita and C. mrigala to thermal acclimation.},
  author       = {Das, T and Pal, AK and Chakraborty, SK and Manush, SM and Dalvi, RS and Apte, SK and Sahu, NP and Baruah, Sri Kartik},
  issn         = {0022-1112},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {SALVELINUS-FONTINALIS,PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSE,STRIPED BASS,VITAMIN-C,METABOLIC-RESPONSES,glucose,lipid,thermal,CATLA-CATLA HAMILTON,ASCORBIC-ACID STATUS,OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION,carps,cortisol,THERMAL TOLERANCE,RAINBOW-TROUT,ascorbic acid},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1487--1498},
  title        = {Biochemical and stress responses of rohu Labeo rohita and mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala in relation to acclimation temperatures},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2009.02216.x},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Das, T, AK Pal, SK Chakraborty, SM Manush, RS Dalvi, SK Apte, NP Sahu, and Sri Kartik Baruah. 2009. “Biochemical and Stress Responses of Rohu Labeo Rohita and Mrigal Cirrhinus Mrigala in Relation to Acclimation Temperatures.” Journal of Fish Biology 74 (7): 1487–1498.
APA
Das, T., Pal, A., Chakraborty, S., Manush, S., Dalvi, R., Apte, S., Sahu, N., et al. (2009). Biochemical and stress responses of rohu Labeo rohita and mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala in relation to acclimation temperatures. JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY, 74(7), 1487–1498.
Vancouver
1.
Das T, Pal A, Chakraborty S, Manush S, Dalvi R, Apte S, et al. Biochemical and stress responses of rohu Labeo rohita and mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala in relation to acclimation temperatures. JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY. 2009;74(7):1487–98.
MLA
Das, T, AK Pal, SK Chakraborty, et al. “Biochemical and Stress Responses of Rohu Labeo Rohita and Mrigal Cirrhinus Mrigala in Relation to Acclimation Temperatures.” JOURNAL OF FISH BIOLOGY 74.7 (2009): 1487–1498. Print.