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Modulation of key metabolic enzyme of Labeo rohita (Hamilton) juvenile: effect of dietary starch type, protein level and exogenous alpha-amylase in the diet

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Abstract
A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to delineate the effect of both gelatinized (G) and non-gelatinized (NG) corn with or without supplementation of exogenous alpha-amylase, either at optimum (35%) or sub-optimum (27%) protein levels, on blood glucose, and the key metabolic enzymes of glycolysis (hexokinase, HK), gluconeogenesis (glucose-6 phosphatase, G6Pase and fructose-1,6 bisphosphatase, FBPase), lipogenesis (glucose-6 phaosphate dehydrogenase, G6PD) and amino acid metabolism (alanine amino transfersae, ALT and aspartate amino transferase, AST) in Labeo rohita. Three hundred and sixty juveniles (average weight 10 +/- A 0.15 g) were randomly distributed into 12 treatment groups with each of two replicates. Twelve semi-purified diets containing either 35 or 27% crude protein were prepared by including G or NG corn as carbohydrate source with different levels of microbial alpha-amylase (0, 50, 100 and 150 mg kg(-1)). The G corn fed groups showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) blood glucose and G6PD activity, whereas G6Pase, FBPase, ALT and AST activity in liver was higher in the NG corn fed group. Dietary corn type, alpha-amylase level in diet or their interaction had no significant effect (P > 0.05) on liver HK activity, but the optimum crude protein (35%) fed group showed higher HK activity than their low protein counterparts. The sub-optimum crude protein (27%) fed group showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) G6PD activity than the optimum protein fed group, whereas the reverse trend was observed for HK, G6Pase, FBPase, ALT and AST activity. Addition of 50 mg alpha-amylase kg(-1) feed showed increased blood glucose and G6PD activity of the NG corn fed group, whereas the reverse trend was found for G6Pase, FBPase, ALT and AST activity in liver, which was similar to that of the G or NG corn supplemented with 100/150 mg alpha-amylase kg(-1) feed. Data on enzyme activities suggest that NG corn in the diet significantly induced more gluconeogenic and amino acid metabolic enzyme activity, whereas G corn induced increased lipogenic enzyme activity. Increased amino acid catabolic enzyme (ALT and AST) activity was observed either at optimum protein (35%) irrespective of corn type or NG corn without supplementation of alpha-amylase irrespective of protein level in the diet.
Keywords
SEABREAM SPARUS-AURATA, BASS DICENTRARCHUS-LABRAX, BIDYANUS-BIDYANUS MITCHELL, CARP CYPRINUS-CARPIO, RAINBOW-TROUT, ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS, CARBOHYDRATE-METABOLISM, GELATINIZED STARCH, DIGESTIBLE ENERGY, TROUT SALMO-GAIRDNERI, Glucose-6-phosphatase, 6-bisphosphatase, Fructose-1, Corn, Aspartate amino transferase, Alanine amino transfersae, alpha-Amylase

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MLA
Kumar, Shivendra et al. “Modulation of Key Metabolic Enzyme of Labeo Rohita (Hamilton) Juvenile: Effect of Dietary Starch Type, Protein Level and Exogenous Alpha-amylase in the Diet.” FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 35.2 (2009): 301–315. Print.
APA
Kumar, Shivendra, Sahu, N., Pal, A., Sagar, V., Sinha, A. K., & Baruah, S. K. (2009). Modulation of key metabolic enzyme of Labeo rohita (Hamilton) juvenile: effect of dietary starch type, protein level and exogenous alpha-amylase in the diet. FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, 35(2), 301–315.
Chicago author-date
Kumar, Shivendra, NP Sahu, AK Pal, Vidya Sagar, Amit Kumar Sinha, and Sri Kartik Baruah. 2009. “Modulation of Key Metabolic Enzyme of Labeo Rohita (Hamilton) Juvenile: Effect of Dietary Starch Type, Protein Level and Exogenous Alpha-amylase in the Diet.” Fish Physiology and Biochemistry 35 (2): 301–315.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Kumar, Shivendra, NP Sahu, AK Pal, Vidya Sagar, Amit Kumar Sinha, and Sri Kartik Baruah. 2009. “Modulation of Key Metabolic Enzyme of Labeo Rohita (Hamilton) Juvenile: Effect of Dietary Starch Type, Protein Level and Exogenous Alpha-amylase in the Diet.” Fish Physiology and Biochemistry 35 (2): 301–315.
Vancouver
1.
Kumar S, Sahu N, Pal A, Sagar V, Sinha AK, Baruah SK. Modulation of key metabolic enzyme of Labeo rohita (Hamilton) juvenile: effect of dietary starch type, protein level and exogenous alpha-amylase in the diet. FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY. 2009;35(2):301–15.
IEEE
[1]
S. Kumar, N. Sahu, A. Pal, V. Sagar, A. K. Sinha, and S. K. Baruah, “Modulation of key metabolic enzyme of Labeo rohita (Hamilton) juvenile: effect of dietary starch type, protein level and exogenous alpha-amylase in the diet,” FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 301–315, 2009.
@article{812363,
  abstract     = {A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to delineate the effect of both gelatinized (G) and non-gelatinized (NG) corn with or without supplementation of exogenous alpha-amylase, either at optimum (35%) or sub-optimum (27%) protein levels, on blood glucose, and the key metabolic enzymes of glycolysis (hexokinase, HK), gluconeogenesis (glucose-6 phosphatase, G6Pase and fructose-1,6 bisphosphatase, FBPase), lipogenesis (glucose-6 phaosphate dehydrogenase, G6PD) and amino acid metabolism (alanine amino transfersae, ALT and aspartate amino transferase, AST) in Labeo rohita. Three hundred and sixty juveniles (average weight 10 +/- A 0.15 g) were randomly distributed into 12 treatment groups with each of two replicates. Twelve semi-purified diets containing either 35 or 27% crude protein were prepared by including G or NG corn as carbohydrate source with different levels of microbial alpha-amylase (0, 50, 100 and 150 mg kg(-1)). The G corn fed groups showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) blood glucose and G6PD activity, whereas G6Pase, FBPase, ALT and AST activity in liver was higher in the NG corn fed group. Dietary corn type, alpha-amylase level in diet or their interaction had no significant effect (P > 0.05) on liver HK activity, but the optimum crude protein (35%) fed group showed higher HK activity than their low protein counterparts. The sub-optimum crude protein (27%) fed group showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) G6PD activity than the optimum protein fed group, whereas the reverse trend was observed for HK, G6Pase, FBPase, ALT and AST activity. Addition of 50 mg alpha-amylase kg(-1) feed showed increased blood glucose and G6PD activity of the NG corn fed group, whereas the reverse trend was found for G6Pase, FBPase, ALT and AST activity in liver, which was similar to that of the G or NG corn supplemented with 100/150 mg alpha-amylase kg(-1) feed. Data on enzyme activities suggest that NG corn in the diet significantly induced more gluconeogenic and amino acid metabolic enzyme activity, whereas G corn induced increased lipogenic enzyme activity. Increased amino acid catabolic enzyme (ALT and AST) activity was observed either at optimum protein (35%) irrespective of corn type or NG corn without supplementation of alpha-amylase irrespective of protein level in the diet.},
  author       = {Kumar, Shivendra and Sahu, NP and Pal, AK and Sagar, Vidya and Sinha, Amit Kumar and Baruah, Sri Kartik},
  issn         = {0920-1742},
  journal      = {FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY},
  keywords     = {SEABREAM SPARUS-AURATA,BASS DICENTRARCHUS-LABRAX,BIDYANUS-BIDYANUS MITCHELL,CARP CYPRINUS-CARPIO,RAINBOW-TROUT,ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS,CARBOHYDRATE-METABOLISM,GELATINIZED STARCH,DIGESTIBLE ENERGY,TROUT SALMO-GAIRDNERI,Glucose-6-phosphatase,6-bisphosphatase,Fructose-1,Corn,Aspartate amino transferase,Alanine amino transfersae,alpha-Amylase},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {301--315},
  title        = {Modulation of key metabolic enzyme of Labeo rohita (Hamilton) juvenile: effect of dietary starch type, protein level and exogenous alpha-amylase in the diet},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10695-008-9213-6},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2009},
}

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