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Development of mycotoxin binding antibody- or MIP-functionalized scaffolds

(2016)
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Abstract
Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by various fungal species which can be present in diverse food and feed matrices. These contaminants can induce several toxic effects in both humans and animals, although they are often present in low concentrations. Consequently, rapid, accurate and sensitive mycotoxin analysis is required to be able to identify and quantify the mycotoxin content in samples. In general, multi-mycotoxin analysis consists of rapid screening and confirmation methods. On the one hand, commercially available rapid tests often use antibodies as specific recognition elements, although they are characterized by some important drawbacks. On the other hand, sample purification prior to LC-MS/MS confirmation analysis is often based on non-selective interactions. In order to meet the existing need for more performant analytical tools and methods, a new type of solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents was proposed based on porous poly-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds loaded with recognition elements. Antibodies remain the golden standard and were used for deoxynivalenol recognition. Additionally, sub-micrometer sized spherical molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) were produced and applied for ergot alkaloid analysis. Next, both recognition elements were immobilized onto PCL by different technologies. In a first step, the immobilization parameters were investigated on 2D surfaces. Secondary antibodies were immobilized by the 2-aminoethyl methacrylate (AEMA) grafting technology. In this respect, the 0.0084 µg/µl concentration was determined as the optimal secondary antibody dilution within the covalent immobilization model. In parallel, MIP were immobilized by the polymer network technology. Successful MIP immobilization was performed by using Pluronic® F127 bismethacrylate (7.5 w%) hydrogel building blocks. Finally, for both recognition elements the optimized parameters were transferred to the more complex 3D format for SPE applications.

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Middeleer, Gilke. 2016. “Development of Mycotoxin Binding Antibody- or MIP-functionalized Scaffolds”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
APA
De Middeleer, G. (2016). Development of mycotoxin binding antibody- or MIP-functionalized scaffolds. Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
De Middeleer G. Development of mycotoxin binding antibody- or MIP-functionalized scaffolds. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; 2016.
MLA
De Middeleer, Gilke. “Development of Mycotoxin Binding Antibody- or MIP-functionalized Scaffolds.” 2016 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{8107771,
  abstract     = {Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by various fungal species which can be present in diverse food and feed matrices. These contaminants can induce several toxic effects in both humans and animals, although they are often present in low concentrations. Consequently, rapid, accurate and sensitive mycotoxin analysis is required to be able to identify and quantify the mycotoxin content in samples. In general, multi-mycotoxin analysis consists of rapid screening and confirmation methods. On the one hand, commercially available rapid tests often use antibodies as specific recognition elements, although they are characterized by some important drawbacks. On the other hand, sample purification prior to LC-MS/MS confirmation analysis is often based on non-selective interactions. In order to meet the existing need for more performant analytical tools and methods, a new type of solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents was proposed based on porous poly-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds loaded with recognition elements. Antibodies remain the golden standard and were used for deoxynivalenol recognition. Additionally, sub-micrometer sized spherical molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) were produced and applied for ergot alkaloid analysis. Next, both recognition elements were immobilized onto PCL by different technologies. In a first step, the immobilization parameters were investigated on 2D surfaces. Secondary antibodies were immobilized by the 2-aminoethyl methacrylate (AEMA) grafting technology. In this respect, the 0.0084 {\textmu}g/{\textmu}l concentration was determined as the optimal secondary antibody dilution within the covalent immobilization model. In parallel, MIP were immobilized by the polymer network technology. Successful MIP immobilization was performed by using Pluronic{\textregistered} F127 bismethacrylate (7.5 w\%) hydrogel building blocks. Finally, for both recognition elements the optimized parameters were transferred to the more complex 3D format for SPE applications.},
  author       = {De Middeleer, Gilke},
  isbn         = {9789461974464},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {227},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Development of mycotoxin binding antibody- or MIP-functionalized scaffolds},
  year         = {2016},
}