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Yttrium-90 labelled resin microspheres for treatment of primary and secondary malignant liver tumors

Christophe Van De Wiele UGent, Luc Defreyne UGent, Marc Peeters UGent and Bieke Lambert UGent (2009) QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING. 53(3). p.317-324
abstract
Neither regional nor systemic chemotherapy significantly improve survival in the majority of patients presenting with liver metastases and their median survival is short. While the incidence of hepatocellular (HCC) is increasingly worldwide, the various treatment approaches that hve been developped to treat non-resectable HCC have had minimal or moderate impact on overall survival. SIR-Spheres (SIRS) are commercially available Y-90-labelled resin microspheres that when selectively injected via the hepatic artery will become trapped in the tumor caplliary bed and will selectively deliver radiation to the tumor whilst sparing normal tissue. in this manuscript, the available literature on the use of SIRS in the clinic is summarized. First, available, predominantly phase I and H studies, on SERS treatment performed in patients suffering from liver metastases as well as in patients suffering from multinodular asymptomatic unresectable HCC with a well preserved liver function have consistently reported a favourable safety profile for SIRS therapy, only a limited number of patients develop gastrointestinal ulceration or bleeding. Second, most of the studies also reported a high reponse rate to SERS treatment resulting in increased life expectancy; median survival rates proved consistently higher when compared to historical controls. Finally, in two randomized controlled phase M trials, benefits were demonstrated for SIRS combined with chemotherapy when compared to the chemoarm alone in patients suffering from colorectal liver metastasis. However, since these reports, novel, potentially more effective chemotherapeutics have been introduced for treating colorectal liver metastasis and the clinical value of Y-90-Sirspheres when compared to these novel chemotherapeutics warrants confirmation and validation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
journal title
QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING
Q. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imag.
volume
53
issue
3
pages
317 - 324
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000268849500007
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
2.877 (2009)
JCR rank
23/104 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
1824-4661
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
810551
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-810551
date created
2009-12-14 13:05:07
date last changed
2009-12-15 16:00:42
@article{810551,
  abstract     = {Neither regional nor systemic chemotherapy significantly improve survival in the majority of patients presenting with liver metastases and their median survival is short. While the incidence of hepatocellular (HCC) is increasingly worldwide, the various treatment approaches that hve been developped to treat non-resectable HCC have had minimal or moderate impact on overall survival. SIR-Spheres (SIRS) are commercially available Y-90-labelled resin microspheres that when selectively injected via the hepatic artery will become trapped in the tumor caplliary bed and will selectively deliver radiation to the tumor whilst sparing normal tissue. in this manuscript, the available literature on the use of SIRS in the clinic is summarized. First, available, predominantly phase I and H studies, on SERS treatment performed in patients suffering from liver metastases as well as in patients suffering from multinodular asymptomatic unresectable HCC with a well preserved liver function have consistently reported a favourable safety profile for SIRS therapy, only a limited number of patients develop gastrointestinal ulceration or bleeding. Second, most of the studies also reported a high reponse rate to SERS treatment resulting in increased life expectancy; median survival rates proved consistently higher when compared to historical controls. Finally, in two randomized controlled phase M trials, benefits were demonstrated for SIRS combined with chemotherapy when compared to the chemoarm alone in patients suffering from colorectal liver metastasis. However, since these reports, novel, potentially more effective chemotherapeutics have been introduced for treating colorectal liver metastasis and the clinical value of Y-90-Sirspheres when compared to these novel chemotherapeutics warrants confirmation and validation.},
  author       = {Van De Wiele, Christophe and Defreyne, Luc and Peeters, Marc and Lambert, Bieke},
  issn         = {1824-4661},
  journal      = {QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {317--324},
  title        = {Yttrium-90 labelled resin microspheres for treatment of primary and secondary malignant liver tumors},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Van De Wiele, Christophe, Luc Defreyne, Marc Peeters, and Bieke Lambert. 2009. “Yttrium-90 Labelled Resin Microspheres for Treatment of Primary and Secondary Malignant Liver Tumors.” Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 53 (3): 317–324.
APA
Van De Wiele, Christophe, Defreyne, L., Peeters, M., & Lambert, B. (2009). Yttrium-90 labelled resin microspheres for treatment of primary and secondary malignant liver tumors. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING, 53(3), 317–324.
Vancouver
1.
Van De Wiele C, Defreyne L, Peeters M, Lambert B. Yttrium-90 labelled resin microspheres for treatment of primary and secondary malignant liver tumors. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING. 2009;53(3):317–24.
MLA
Van De Wiele, Christophe, Luc Defreyne, Marc Peeters, et al. “Yttrium-90 Labelled Resin Microspheres for Treatment of Primary and Secondary Malignant Liver Tumors.” QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING 53.3 (2009): 317–324. Print.