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Abstract
Until very recently, Cappadocian Greek seemed to have disappeared without a trace. Linguists and dialectologists even believed it had become extinct altogether. However, one Cappadocian variety, Mišótika, is still spoken in some villages and towns in the decentralized administrations of Macedonia and Thrace, Epirus and Western Macedonia, and Thessaly and Central Greece. The dialect is undergoing attrition under the growing pressure of Standard Modern Greek and its regional varieties and is actually being re-Hellenized. Even the oldest speakers make free use of Greek instead of Misiótika words and expressions and attrition is noticeable in at the phonological, morphological and syntactic levels. As a result, there are now many semi- or even would-be speakers whose speech is located somewhere on a continuum from Mišótika with Standard or Regional Modern Greek elements in it to Standard or Regional Modern Greek with Mišótika elements in it - in both cases mostly words and phrases. Over the past ten years, we have witnessed a growing interest in Mišótika as a marker of (Mišótika) Cappadocian identity. Speakers feel more confident to speak their language in public, for instance at the annual Gavoustima, where theatrical plays in Mišótika are now regularly performed by the syllogos of Néo Agionéri (to the amusement and also to bewilderment of the audience). Remarkably and very fortunately, Mišótika is now also used in the Social Media. I will concentrate here on Facebook, especially on the page called Έναρξη Διδασκαλίας Εκµάθησης Μυστιώτικου Ιδιώµατος ( group 470281169768316 on FB). The title is identical with the subtitle of Thomas Fates’ book Χ͜ιογός α ας χαρίσ̌’, which is some sort of “Teach Yourself Mišótika” and in which, interestingly, a special orthography for Mišótika has been developed. I will discuss the kind of information found on the FB page: questions, questionnaires, explanations of words and short phrases, folktales and other short stories, audio & video clips etc. Particular attention will be paid to the problems of using the Greek alphabet to write Mišótika in relation to the ongoing phonological attrition and also to the insecurity when it comes to interpretation linguistic phenomena in Mišótika.
Keywords
Cappadocian Greek, Asia Minor Greek, Misiotika, social media, Mišótika, language maintenance, Facebook, endangered languages, minority languages, linguistic insecurity

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Chicago
Janse, Mark. 2016. “Cappadocian in the Social Media Era.” In 7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory, ed. Ioanna Kappa and Marina Tzakosta, 20–20. Rhethymno: University of Crete.
APA
Janse, M. (2016). Cappadocian in the social media era. In I. Kappa & M. Tzakosta (Eds.), 7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory (pp. 20–20). Presented at the 7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory, Rhethymno: University of Crete.
Vancouver
1.
Janse M. Cappadocian in the social media era. In: Kappa I, Tzakosta M, editors. 7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory. Rhethymno: University of Crete; 2016. p. 20–20.
MLA
Janse, Mark. “Cappadocian in the Social Media Era.” 7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory. Ed. Ioanna Kappa & Marina Tzakosta. Rhethymno: University of Crete, 2016. 20–20. Print.
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  abstract     = {Until very recently, Cappadocian Greek seemed to have disappeared without a trace. Linguists and dialectologists even believed it had become extinct altogether. However, one Cappadocian variety, Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika, is still spoken in some villages and towns in the decentralized
administrations of Macedonia and Thrace, Epirus and Western Macedonia, and Thessaly and Central Greece. The dialect is undergoing attrition under the growing pressure of Standard Modern Greek and its regional varieties and is actually being re-Hellenized. Even the oldest
speakers make free use of Greek instead of Misi{\'o}tika words and expressions and attrition is noticeable in at the phonological, morphological and syntactic levels. As a result, there are now many semi- or even would-be speakers whose speech is located somewhere on a continuum from Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika with Standard or Regional Modern Greek elements in it to Standard or Regional Modern Greek with Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika elements in it - in both cases mostly words and phrases. Over the past ten years, we have witnessed a growing interest in Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika as a
marker of (Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika) Cappadocian identity. Speakers feel more confident to speak their language in public, for instance at the annual Gavoustima, where theatrical plays in Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika are now regularly performed by the syllogos of N{\'e}o Agion{\'e}ri (to the amusement and also to bewilderment of the audience). Remarkably and very fortunately, Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika is now also used in the Social Media. I will concentrate here on Facebook, especially on the page called \unmatched{1fc9}\ensuremath{\nu}\ensuremath{\alpha}\ensuremath{\rho}\ensuremath{\xi}\ensuremath{\eta} \ensuremath{\Delta}\ensuremath{\iota}\ensuremath{\delta}\ensuremath{\alpha}\ensuremath{\sigma}\ensuremath{\kappa}\ensuremath{\alpha}\ensuremath{\lambda}\unmatched{1f77}\ensuremath{\alpha}\unmatched{03c2} \ensuremath{\mathrm{E}}\ensuremath{\kappa}{\textmu}\unmatched{1f71}\ensuremath{\theta}\ensuremath{\eta}\ensuremath{\sigma}\ensuremath{\eta}\unmatched{03c2} \ensuremath{\mathrm{M}}\ensuremath{\upsilon}\ensuremath{\sigma}\ensuremath{\tau}\ensuremath{\iota}\unmatched{1f7d}\ensuremath{\tau}\ensuremath{\iota}\ensuremath{\kappa}\ensuremath{o}\ensuremath{\upsilon} \ensuremath{\mathrm{I}}\ensuremath{\delta}\ensuremath{\iota}\unmatched{1f7d}{\textmu}\ensuremath{\alpha}\ensuremath{\tau}\ensuremath{o}\unmatched{03c2} ( group 470281169768316 on FB). The title is identical with the subtitle of Thomas Fates{\textquoteright} book \ensuremath{\mathrm{X}}\unmatched{035c}\ensuremath{\iota}\ensuremath{o}\ensuremath{\gamma}\unmatched{1f79}\unmatched{03c2} \ensuremath{\alpha} \ensuremath{\alpha}\unmatched{03c2} \ensuremath{\chi}\ensuremath{\alpha}\ensuremath{\rho}\unmatched{1f77}\ensuremath{\sigma}\unmatched{030c}{\textquoteright}, which is some sort of {\textquotedblleft}Teach Yourself Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika{\textquotedblright} and in which, interestingly, a special orthography for Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika has been developed. I will discuss the kind of information found on the FB page: questions, questionnaires, explanations of words and short phrases, folktales and other short stories, audio \& video clips etc. Particular attention will be paid to the problems of using the Greek alphabet to write Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika in relation to the ongoing phonological attrition and also to the insecurity when it comes to interpretation linguistic phenomena in Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika.},
  author       = {Janse, Mark},
  booktitle    = {7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory},
  editor       = {Kappa, Ioanna and Tzakosta, Marina},
  keyword      = {Cappadocian Greek,Asia Minor Greek,Misiotika,social media,Mi\v{s}{\'o}tika,language maintenance,Facebook,endangered languages,minority languages,linguistic insecurity},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {House of Culture, Rethymno},
  pages        = {20--20},
  publisher    = {University of Crete},
  title        = {Cappadocian in the social media era},
  url          = {http://mgdlt7.edc.uoc.gr/abstracts-booklet/},
  year         = {2016},
}