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Short-term beef consumption promotes systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation in rats, and dietary fat content modulates these effects

(2016) FOOD & FUNCTION. 7(9). p.3760-3771
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Abstract
A high consumption of red and/or processed meat is associated with a higher risk to develop several chronic diseases in which oxidative stress, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and/or inflammation are involved. We aimed to elucidate the effect of white (chicken) vs. red (beef) meat consumption in a low vs. high dietary fat context (2 × 2 factorial design) on oxidative stress, TMAO and inflammation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were found in gastrointestinal contents (up to 96% higher) and colonic tissues (+8.8%) of rats fed the beef diets (all P < 0.05). The lean beef diet resulted in lower blood glutathione, higher urinary excretion of the major 4-hydroxy-nonenal metabolite, and higher plasma C-reactive protein, compared to the other dietary treatments (all P < 0.05). Rats on the fat beef diet had higher renal MDA (+24.4% compared to all other diets) and heart MDA (+12.9% compared to lean chicken) and lower liver vitamin E (−26.2% compared to lean chicken) (all P < 0.05). Rats on the fat diets had lower plasma vitamin E (−23.8%), lower brain MDA (−6.8%) and higher plasma superoxide dismutase activity (+38.6%), higher blood glutathione (+16.9%) (all P < 0.05) and tendency to higher ventral prostate MDA (+14.5%, P = 0.078) and prostate weight (+18.9%, P = 0.073), compared to rats on the lean diets. Consumption of the beef diets resulted in higher urinary trimethylamine (4.5-fold) and TMAO (3.7-fold) concentrations (P < 0.001), compared to the chicken diets. In conclusion, consumption of a high beef diet may stimulate gastrointestinal and/or systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation, depending on the dietary fat content and composition.
Keywords
PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, DNA ADDUCT FORMATION, C-REACTIVE PROTEIN, RED MEAT INTAKE, LIPID-PEROXIDATION, METABOLIC SYNDROME, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, DIABETES-MELLITUS, KIDNEY-DISEASE

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Chicago
Van Hecke, Thomas, Louise MA Jakobsen, Els Vossen, Françoise Guéraud, Filip De Vos, Fabrice Pierre, Hanne CS Bertram, and Stefaan De Smet. 2016. “Short-term Beef Consumption Promotes Systemic Oxidative Stress, TMAO Formation and Inflammation in Rats, and Dietary Fat Content Modulates These Effects.” Food & Function 7 (9): 3760–3771.
APA
Van Hecke, Thomas, Jakobsen, L. M., Vossen, E., Guéraud, F., De Vos, F., Pierre, F., Bertram, H. C., et al. (2016). Short-term beef consumption promotes systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation in rats, and dietary fat content modulates these effects. FOOD & FUNCTION, 7(9), 3760–3771.
Vancouver
1.
Van Hecke T, Jakobsen LM, Vossen E, Guéraud F, De Vos F, Pierre F, et al. Short-term beef consumption promotes systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation in rats, and dietary fat content modulates these effects. FOOD & FUNCTION. 2016;7(9):3760–71.
MLA
Van Hecke, Thomas, Louise MA Jakobsen, Els Vossen, et al. “Short-term Beef Consumption Promotes Systemic Oxidative Stress, TMAO Formation and Inflammation in Rats, and Dietary Fat Content Modulates These Effects.” FOOD & FUNCTION 7.9 (2016): 3760–3771. Print.
@article{8100385,
  abstract     = {A high consumption of red and/or processed meat is associated with a higher risk to develop several chronic diseases in which oxidative stress, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and/or inflammation are involved. We aimed to elucidate the effect of white (chicken) vs. red (beef) meat consumption in a low vs. high dietary fat context (2 {\texttimes} 2 factorial design) on oxidative stress, TMAO and inflammation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were found in gastrointestinal contents (up to 96\% higher) and colonic tissues (+8.8\%) of rats fed the beef diets (all P {\textlangle} 0.05). The lean beef diet resulted in lower blood glutathione, higher urinary excretion of the major 4-hydroxy-nonenal metabolite, and higher plasma C-reactive protein, compared to the other dietary treatments (all P {\textlangle} 0.05). Rats on the fat beef diet had higher renal MDA (+24.4\% compared to all other diets) and heart MDA (+12.9\% compared to lean chicken) and lower liver vitamin E (\ensuremath{-}26.2\% compared to lean chicken) (all P {\textlangle} 0.05). Rats on the fat diets had lower plasma vitamin E (\ensuremath{-}23.8\%), lower brain MDA (\ensuremath{-}6.8\%) and higher plasma superoxide dismutase activity (+38.6\%), higher blood glutathione (+16.9\%) (all P {\textlangle} 0.05) and tendency to higher ventral prostate MDA (+14.5\%, P = 0.078) and prostate weight (+18.9\%, P = 0.073), compared to rats on the lean diets. Consumption of the beef diets resulted in higher urinary trimethylamine (4.5-fold) and TMAO (3.7-fold) concentrations (P {\textlangle} 0.001), compared to the chicken diets. In conclusion, consumption of a high beef diet may stimulate gastrointestinal and/or systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation, depending on the dietary fat content and composition.},
  author       = {Van Hecke, Thomas and Jakobsen, Louise MA and Vossen, Els and Gu{\'e}raud, Fran\c{c}oise and De Vos, Filip and Pierre, Fabrice and Bertram, Hanne CS and De Smet, Stefaan},
  issn         = {2042-6496},
  journal      = {FOOD \& FUNCTION},
  keyword      = {PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY,CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE,DNA ADDUCT FORMATION,C-REACTIVE PROTEIN,RED MEAT INTAKE,LIPID-PEROXIDATION,METABOLIC SYNDROME,CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE,DIABETES-MELLITUS,KIDNEY-DISEASE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {3760--3771},
  title        = {Short-term beef consumption promotes systemic oxidative stress, TMAO formation and inflammation in rats, and dietary fat content modulates these effects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6fo00462h},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2016},
}

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