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Lookalike professional English

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Abstract
Background: Our teaching case reports on a fieldwork assignment designed to have master of arts students experience first-hand how entrepreneurs write for the globalized marketplace by examining public displays of language such as billboards, shop windows, and posters. Research questions: How do entrepreneurs use English to “style” themselves? What is the status of English in public displays? Which relationship with customers is cultivated by using English (among other languages)? How does English, or lookalike versions thereof, create a more innovative business? Situating the Case: We use linguistic landscaping as a pedagogical resource, drawing on similar cases in a local English as a foreign language (EFL) community in Oaxaca, Mexico; EFL programs in Chiba-shi, Japan; francophone and immersion French programs in Montreal and Vancouver, Canada; and a study of the entrepreneurial landscape in Observatory's business corridor of Lower Main Road in Cape Town, South Africa. How this case was studied: We interviewed 36 students about their learning process in one-to-one post hoc interviews. Recurrent themes were increased self-monitoring, improved professional communication literacy, and expanded real-world understanding. About the case: The teaching case follows a three-pronged approach. First, we have students decide on a survey area, determine their empirical focus, establish analytical units, decide how to collect data, collect (sociodemographic) information about their survey area, and determine the degree of researcher engagement. Next, students conduct fieldwork, documenting the linguistic landscape in small teams of three to four students. In the third phase, students have returned from the field and discuss their initial findings, ideas, and observations during a data session with the instructors. Students decide whether they still stand by the decisions they made before they entered the field and are then asked to qualify how language is used in public space. Results: The main takeaway of the assignment is that students were more aware of the degree of linguistic innovation, rhetorical creativity, and ethnocultural stereotyping of entrepreneurial communication in their cities. Conclusion: As a pedagogical tool, LL offers possibilities for exploring entrepreneurial communication in all its breadth and variety, providing access to perhaps the most visible and creative materialities of entrepreneurs and service providers: shop windows and signs.
Keywords
lookalike English, linguistic landscape, entrepreneurship communication, professional communication

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MLA
Van Hout, Tom, and Ellen Van Praet. “Lookalike Professional English.” IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION 59.4 (2016): 398–406. Print.
APA
Van Hout, T., & Van Praet, E. (2016). Lookalike professional English. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, 59(4), 398–406.
Chicago author-date
Van Hout, Tom, and Ellen Van Praet. 2016. “Lookalike Professional English.” Ieee Transactions on Professional Communication 59 (4): 398–406.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Hout, Tom, and Ellen Van Praet. 2016. “Lookalike Professional English.” Ieee Transactions on Professional Communication 59 (4): 398–406.
Vancouver
1.
Van Hout T, Van Praet E. Lookalike professional English. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION. IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC; 2016;59(4):398–406.
IEEE
[1]
T. Van Hout and E. Van Praet, “Lookalike professional English,” IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 398–406, 2016.
@article{8099234,
  abstract     = {{Background: Our teaching case reports on a fieldwork assignment designed to have master of arts students experience first-hand how entrepreneurs write for the globalized marketplace by examining public displays of language such as billboards, shop windows, and posters. 

Research questions: How do entrepreneurs use English to “style” themselves? What is the status of English in public displays? Which relationship with customers is cultivated by using English (among other languages)? How does English, or lookalike versions thereof, create a more innovative business? 

Situating the Case:  We use linguistic landscaping as a pedagogical resource, drawing on similar cases in a local English as a foreign language (EFL) community in Oaxaca, Mexico; EFL programs in Chiba-shi, Japan; francophone and immersion French programs in Montreal and Vancouver, Canada; and a study of the entrepreneurial landscape in Observatory's business corridor of Lower Main Road in Cape Town, South Africa. 

How this case was studied:  We interviewed 36 students about their learning process in one-to-one post hoc interviews. Recurrent themes were increased self-monitoring, improved professional communication literacy, and expanded real-world understanding. 

About the case: The teaching case follows a three-pronged approach. First, we have students decide on a survey area, determine their empirical focus, establish analytical units, decide how to collect data, collect (sociodemographic) information about their survey area, and determine the degree of researcher engagement. Next, students conduct fieldwork, documenting the linguistic landscape in small teams of three to four students. In the third phase, students have returned from the field and discuss their initial findings, ideas, and observations during a data session with the instructors. Students decide whether they still stand by the decisions they made before they entered the field and are then asked to qualify how language is used in public space.  

Results: The main takeaway of the assignment is that students were more aware of the degree of linguistic innovation, rhetorical creativity, and ethnocultural stereotyping of entrepreneurial communication in their cities. 

Conclusion: As a pedagogical tool, LL offers possibilities for exploring entrepreneurial communication in all its breadth and variety, providing access to perhaps the most visible and creative materialities of entrepreneurs and service providers: shop windows and signs.}},
  author       = {{Van Hout, Tom and Van Praet, Ellen}},
  issn         = {{0361-1434}},
  journal      = {{IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION}},
  keywords     = {{lookalike English,linguistic landscape,entrepreneurship communication,professional communication}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{4}},
  pages        = {{398--406}},
  publisher    = {{IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC}},
  title        = {{Lookalike professional English}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TPC.2016.2608198}},
  volume       = {{59}},
  year         = {{2016}},
}

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