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Swarming behaviour, catchment area and seasonal movement patterns of the Bechstein's bats : implications for conservation

(2016) ACTA CHIROPTEROLOGICA. 18(2). p.349-358
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Abstract
Bats display marked seasonality throughout the temperate zone and use different habitats during different parts of the year. Unfortunately, detailed information regarding seasonal distribution and movements is often lacking, thereby hampering the development of adequate conservation measures. In this study we used radio telemetry to track females of the endangered Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii) from autumn swarming sites to their summer maternity colony ranges. We were able to tag 22 individuals, 18 of which were subsequently recovered at nine roost sites up to 20.6 km away. Females from multiple colonies visited the same swarming site on a single night. Concurrently, we recovered females from a single maternity colony at different swarming sites on the same night. The catchment area of the investigated swarming sites measured 27.1 km2, and was skewed to the northwest. Tagged bats were recovered in forest fragments ranging in size from 5.42 to 128.98 ha. Notably, all but one of the recovered roosts were found in forests that have been continuously wooded since at least 1775. Surveys during the summer at these sites confirmed the presence of maternity colonies at six out of seven locations that could be investigated. Our study contributes to our understanding of swarming behavior and seasonal movement patterns, and exemplifies how these can be used to complete the year-round habitat use of bat species.
Keywords
Myotis, ancient forest, telemetry, hibernation site, swarming site, Myotis bechsteinii, radio tracking

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Citation

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Chicago
Dekeukeleire, Daan, René Janssen, Anne-Jifke Haarsma, Thijs Bosch, and Jaap van Schaik. 2016. “Swarming Behaviour, Catchment Area and Seasonal Movement Patterns of the Bechstein’s Bats : Implications for Conservation.” Acta Chiropterologica 18 (2): 349–358.
APA
Dekeukeleire, D., Janssen, R., Haarsma, A.-J., Bosch, T., & van Schaik, J. (2016). Swarming behaviour, catchment area and seasonal movement patterns of the Bechstein’s bats : implications for conservation. ACTA CHIROPTEROLOGICA, 18(2), 349–358.
Vancouver
1.
Dekeukeleire D, Janssen R, Haarsma A-J, Bosch T, van Schaik J. Swarming behaviour, catchment area and seasonal movement patterns of the Bechstein’s bats : implications for conservation. ACTA CHIROPTEROLOGICA. 2016;18(2):349–58.
MLA
Dekeukeleire, Daan et al. “Swarming Behaviour, Catchment Area and Seasonal Movement Patterns of the Bechstein’s Bats : Implications for Conservation.” ACTA CHIROPTEROLOGICA 18.2 (2016): 349–358. Print.
@article{8086631,
  abstract     = {Bats display marked seasonality throughout the temperate zone and use different habitats during different parts of the year. Unfortunately, detailed information regarding seasonal distribution and movements is often lacking, thereby hampering the development of adequate conservation measures. In this study we used radio telemetry to track females of the endangered Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii) from autumn swarming sites to their summer maternity colony ranges. We were able to tag 22 individuals, 18 of which were subsequently recovered at nine roost sites up to 20.6 km away. Females from multiple colonies visited the same swarming site on a single night. Concurrently, we recovered females from a single maternity colony at different swarming sites on the same night. The catchment area of the investigated swarming sites measured 27.1 km2, and was skewed to the northwest. Tagged bats were recovered in forest fragments ranging in size from 5.42 to 128.98 ha. Notably, all but one of the recovered roosts were found in forests that have been continuously wooded since at least 1775. Surveys during the summer at these sites confirmed the presence of maternity colonies at six out of seven locations that could be investigated. Our study contributes to our understanding of swarming behavior and seasonal movement patterns, and exemplifies how these can be used to complete the year-round habitat use of bat species.},
  author       = {Dekeukeleire, Daan and Janssen, René and Haarsma, Anne-Jifke and Bosch, Thijs and van Schaik, Jaap},
  issn         = {1508-1109},
  journal      = {ACTA CHIROPTEROLOGICA},
  keywords     = {Myotis,ancient forest,telemetry,hibernation site,swarming site,Myotis bechsteinii,radio tracking},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {349--358},
  title        = {Swarming behaviour, catchment area and seasonal movement patterns of the Bechstein's bats : implications for conservation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3161/15081109ACC2016.18.2.004},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2016},
}

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