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Transcranial direct current stimulation over the right frontal inferior cortex decreases neural activity needed to achieve inhibition : a double-blind ERP study in a male population

(2017) CLINICAL EEG AND NEUROSCIENCE. 48(3). p.176-188
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The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
Abstract
Inhibitory control refers to the ability to inhibit an action once it has been initiated. Impaired inhibitory control plays a key role in triggering relapse in some pathological states, such as addictions. Therefore, a major challenge of current research is to establish new methods to strengthen inhibitory control in these "high-risk" populations. In this attempt, the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC), a neural correlate crucial for inhibitory control, was modulated using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Healthy participants (n = 31) were presented with a "Go/No-go" task, a well-known paradigm to measure inhibitory control. During this task, an event-related potential (ERP) recording (T1; 32 channels) was performed. One subgroup (n = 15) was randomly assigned to a condition with tDCS (anodal electrode was placed on the rIFC and the cathodal on the neck); and the other group (n = 16) to a condition with sham (placebo) tDCS. After one 20-minute neuromodulation session, all participants were confronted again with the same ERP Go/ No-go task (T2). To ensure that potential tDCS effects were specific to inhibition, ERPs to a face-detection task were also recorded at T1 and T2 in both subgroups. The rate of commission errors on the Go/ No-go task was similar between T1 and T2 in both neuromodulation groups. However, the amplitude of the P3d component, indexing the inhibition function per se, was reduced at T2 as compared with T1. This effect was specific for participants in the tDCS (and not sham) condition for correctly inhibited trials. No difference in the P3 component was observable between both subgroups at T1 and T2 for the face detection task. Overall, the present data indicate that boosting the rIFC specifically enhances inhibitory skills by decreasing the neural activity needed to correctly inhibit a response.
Keywords
right inferior frontal gyrus, inhibition, Evoked potential, tDCS, amplitude modulation, EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS, DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, DETOXIFIED ALCOHOLIC PATIENTS, GO NOGO TASKS, RESPONSE-INHIBITION, COGNITIVE CONTROL, WORKING-MEMORY, GO/NOGO TASK, GREATER SENSITIVITY, MAJOR DEPRESSION

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Campanella, Salvatore, Elisa Schroder, Aurore Monnart, Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt, Romain Duprat, Mark Rabijns, Charles Kornreich, Paul Verbanck, and Chris Baeken. 2017. “Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over the Right Frontal Inferior Cortex Decreases Neural Activity Needed to Achieve Inhibition : a Double-blind ERP Study in a Male Population.” Clinical Eeg and Neuroscience 48 (3): 176–188.
APA
Campanella, S., Schroder, E., Monnart, A., Vanderhasselt, M.-A., Duprat, R., Rabijns, M., Kornreich, C., et al. (2017). Transcranial direct current stimulation over the right frontal inferior cortex decreases neural activity needed to achieve inhibition : a double-blind ERP study in a male population. CLINICAL EEG AND NEUROSCIENCE, 48(3), 176–188.
Vancouver
1.
Campanella S, Schroder E, Monnart A, Vanderhasselt M-A, Duprat R, Rabijns M, et al. Transcranial direct current stimulation over the right frontal inferior cortex decreases neural activity needed to achieve inhibition : a double-blind ERP study in a male population. CLINICAL EEG AND NEUROSCIENCE. 2017;48(3):176–88.
MLA
Campanella, Salvatore et al. “Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over the Right Frontal Inferior Cortex Decreases Neural Activity Needed to Achieve Inhibition : a Double-blind ERP Study in a Male Population.” CLINICAL EEG AND NEUROSCIENCE 48.3 (2017): 176–188. Print.
@article{8085742,
  abstract     = {Inhibitory control refers to the ability to inhibit an action once it has been initiated. Impaired inhibitory control plays a key role in triggering relapse in some pathological states, such as addictions. Therefore, a major challenge of current research is to establish new methods to strengthen inhibitory control in these "high-risk" populations. In this attempt, the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC), a neural correlate crucial for inhibitory control, was modulated using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Healthy participants (n = 31) were presented with a "Go/No-go" task, a well-known paradigm to measure inhibitory control. During this task, an event-related potential (ERP) recording (T1; 32 channels) was performed. One subgroup (n = 15) was randomly assigned to a condition with tDCS (anodal electrode was placed on the rIFC and the cathodal on the neck); and the other group (n = 16) to a condition with sham (placebo) tDCS. After one 20-minute neuromodulation session, all participants were confronted again with the same ERP Go/ No-go task (T2). To ensure that potential tDCS effects were specific to inhibition, ERPs to a face-detection task were also recorded at T1 and T2 in both subgroups. The rate of commission errors on the Go/ No-go task was similar between T1 and T2 in both neuromodulation groups. However, the amplitude of the P3d component, indexing the inhibition function per se, was reduced at T2 as compared with T1. This effect was specific for participants in the tDCS (and not sham) condition for correctly inhibited trials. No difference in the P3 component was observable between both subgroups at T1 and T2 for the face detection task. Overall, the present data indicate that boosting the rIFC specifically enhances inhibitory skills by decreasing the neural activity needed to correctly inhibit a response.},
  author       = {Campanella, Salvatore and Schroder, Elisa and Monnart, Aurore and Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne and Duprat, Romain and Rabijns, Mark and Kornreich, Charles and Verbanck, Paul and Baeken, Chris},
  issn         = {1550-0594},
  journal      = {CLINICAL EEG AND NEUROSCIENCE},
  keywords     = {right inferior frontal gyrus,inhibition,Evoked potential,tDCS,amplitude modulation,EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS,DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX,DETOXIFIED ALCOHOLIC PATIENTS,GO NOGO TASKS,RESPONSE-INHIBITION,COGNITIVE CONTROL,WORKING-MEMORY,GO/NOGO TASK,GREATER SENSITIVITY,MAJOR DEPRESSION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {176--188},
  title        = {Transcranial direct current stimulation over the right frontal inferior cortex decreases neural activity needed to achieve inhibition : a double-blind ERP study in a male population},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1550059416645977},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2017},
}

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