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Postcolonial manifestations of African spatiality in Europe: the invisible African churches of Ghent

Luce Beeckmans (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
In Ghent the arrival of African migrants has resulted in the rise of Afro-Christian churches that are said to deploy a ‘reverse mission’ to Europe. Through processes of occupation and appropriation Africans have transformed existing non-religious buildings into places of worship. The result are ‘hybrid’ architectural forms, deeply informed by the transnational lives of most African migrants. Because African architectural forms in the European city are the fruit of (unfulfilled) dreams, nostalgia, identity-building and transnational connections, their study may help to look beyond a handful stereotypes of how postcolonial subjects from Africa contribute to the shaping of cities outside Africa.
Keywords
European cities, African churches, migrant spatiality, architectural appropriation, hybrid architecture, transnationalism, identity-building

Citation

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Chicago
Beeckmans, Luce. 2016. “Postcolonial Manifestations of African Spatiality in Europe: The Invisible African Churches of Ghent.” In Eighth World Archaeological Congress.
APA
Beeckmans, Luce. (2016). Postcolonial manifestations of African spatiality in Europe: the invisible African churches of Ghent. Eighth World Archaeological Congress. Presented at the Eighth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-8).
Vancouver
1.
Beeckmans L. Postcolonial manifestations of African spatiality in Europe: the invisible African churches of Ghent. Eighth World Archaeological Congress. 2016.
MLA
Beeckmans, Luce. “Postcolonial Manifestations of African Spatiality in Europe: The Invisible African Churches of Ghent.” Eighth World Archaeological Congress. 2016. Print.
@inproceedings{8085395,
  abstract     = {In Ghent the arrival of African migrants has resulted in the rise of Afro-Christian churches that are said to deploy a ‘reverse mission’ to Europe. Through processes of occupation and appropriation Africans have transformed existing non-religious buildings into places of worship. The result are ‘hybrid’ architectural forms, deeply informed by the transnational lives of most African migrants. Because African architectural forms in the European city are the fruit of (unfulfilled) dreams, nostalgia, identity-building and transnational connections, their study may help to look beyond a handful stereotypes of how postcolonial subjects from Africa contribute to the shaping of cities outside Africa.},
  author       = {Beeckmans, Luce},
  booktitle    = {Eighth World Archaeological Congress},
  keywords     = {European cities,African churches,migrant spatiality,architectural appropriation,hybrid architecture,transnationalism,identity-building},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Kyoto},
  title        = {Postcolonial manifestations of African spatiality in Europe: the invisible African churches of Ghent},
  url          = {http://wac8.org/},
  year         = {2016},
}