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In situ quantification of forage grass root biomass, distribution and diameter classes under two N fertilisation rates

(2017) PLANT AND SOIL. 411(1). p.409-422
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Abstract
Background & aims: Roots are of paramount importance in protecting grassland in numerous ecosystem services e.g. soil organic matter build-up. However, studies that quantified root biomass in grasslands predominantly focused on areas managed less intensively than the management that is common to most North-West European grassland-based farms. To fill this knowledge gap, we compared, root and stubble biomass, the distribution in the soil and root diameter classes of five common European forage grass species grown under intensive management. Methods: On a 3 year old trial comparing yield of five cool season forage grass species at two N fertilization levels (190 kg N ha−1 yr−1 or 300 kg N ha−1 yr−1) we sampled root and stubble biomass until a depth of 90 cm deep. Results: Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) displayed the highest root and stubble biomass and had the highest mean root diameters of all studied grass species. The total dry biomass below cutting height (stubble + roots up to a depth of 90 cm below the soil surface) varied between 18 and 19 tonnes ha−1 for tall fescue and 10 and 11 tonnes ha−1 for Festulolium at 190 kg N ha−1 yr−1 and 300 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings emphasize that in intensively managed grassland, root and stubble biomass under a 3 years old sward can be as high as 19 t DM ha−1. Owing to the high forage and root biomass of tall fescue, this species has a high potential in maintaining several ecosystem services.
Keywords
Tall fescue, Festulolium, Perennial ryegrass, Meadow fescue, Carbon sequestration, Image analysis, LOLIUM-PERENNE L., TALL FESCUE, CARBON, SYSTEMS, SEQUESTRATION, MIXTURES, RYEGRASS, PASTURE, SWARDS, DEEP

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Cougnon, Mathias et al. “In Situ Quantification of Forage Grass Root Biomass, Distribution and Diameter Classes Under Two N Fertilisation Rates.” PLANT AND SOIL 411.1 (2017): 409–422. Print.
APA
Cougnon, M., De Swaef, T., Lootens, P., Baert, J., De Frenne, P., Shahidi, R., Roldàn-Ruiz, I., et al. (2017). In situ quantification of forage grass root biomass, distribution and diameter classes under two N fertilisation rates. PLANT AND SOIL, 411(1), 409–422. Presented at the 4th International Zinc (Zn) Symposium.
Chicago author-date
Cougnon, Mathias, Tom De Swaef, Peter Lootens, Joost Baert, Pieter De Frenne, Reihaneh Shahidi, Isabel Roldàn-Ruiz, and Dirk Reheul. 2017. “In Situ Quantification of Forage Grass Root Biomass, Distribution and Diameter Classes Under Two N Fertilisation Rates.” Plant and Soil 411 (1): 409–422.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Cougnon, Mathias, Tom De Swaef, Peter Lootens, Joost Baert, Pieter De Frenne, Reihaneh Shahidi, Isabel Roldàn-Ruiz, and Dirk Reheul. 2017. “In Situ Quantification of Forage Grass Root Biomass, Distribution and Diameter Classes Under Two N Fertilisation Rates.” Plant and Soil 411 (1): 409–422.
Vancouver
1.
Cougnon M, De Swaef T, Lootens P, Baert J, De Frenne P, Shahidi R, et al. In situ quantification of forage grass root biomass, distribution and diameter classes under two N fertilisation rates. PLANT AND SOIL. 2017;411(1):409–22.
IEEE
[1]
M. Cougnon et al., “In situ quantification of forage grass root biomass, distribution and diameter classes under two N fertilisation rates,” PLANT AND SOIL, vol. 411, no. 1, pp. 409–422, 2017.
@article{8070820,
  abstract     = {Background & aims: Roots are of paramount importance in protecting grassland in numerous ecosystem services e.g. soil organic matter build-up. However, studies that quantified root biomass in grasslands predominantly focused on areas managed less intensively than the management that is common to most North-West European grassland-based farms. To fill this knowledge gap, we compared, root and stubble biomass, the distribution in the soil and root diameter classes of five common European forage grass species grown under intensive management.
Methods: On a 3 year old trial comparing yield of five cool season forage grass species at two N fertilization levels (190 kg N ha−1 yr−1 or 300 kg N ha−1 yr−1) we sampled root and stubble biomass until a depth of 90 cm deep.
Results: Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) displayed the highest root and stubble biomass and had the highest mean root diameters of all studied grass species. The total dry biomass below cutting height (stubble + roots up to a depth of 90 cm below the soil surface) varied between 18 and 19 tonnes ha−1 for tall fescue and 10 and 11 tonnes ha−1 for Festulolium at 190 kg N ha−1 yr−1 and 300 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively.
Conclusions: Our findings emphasize that in intensively managed grassland, root and stubble biomass under a 3 years old sward can be as high as 19 t DM ha−1. Owing to the high forage and root biomass of tall fescue, this species has a high potential in maintaining several ecosystem services.},
  author       = {Cougnon, Mathias and De Swaef, Tom and Lootens, Peter and Baert, Joost and De Frenne, Pieter and Shahidi, Reihaneh and Roldàn-Ruiz, Isabel and Reheul, Dirk},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  journal      = {PLANT AND SOIL},
  keywords     = {Tall fescue,Festulolium,Perennial ryegrass,Meadow fescue,Carbon sequestration,Image analysis,LOLIUM-PERENNE L.,TALL FESCUE,CARBON,SYSTEMS,SEQUESTRATION,MIXTURES,RYEGRASS,PASTURE,SWARDS,DEEP},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Sao Paulo, Brazil},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {409--422},
  title        = {In situ quantification of forage grass root biomass, distribution and diameter classes under two N fertilisation rates},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-016-3034-7},
  volume       = {411},
  year         = {2017},
}

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