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Methods and models for brain connectivity assessment across levels of consciousness

Enrico Amico (UGent)
(2016)
Author
Promoter
Steven Laureys and (UGent)
Organization
Abstract
The human brain is one of the most complex and fascinating systems in nature. In the last decades, two events have boosted the investigation of its functional and structural properties. Firstly, the emergence of novel noninvasive neuroimaging modalities, which helped improving the spatial and temporal resolution of the data collected from in vivo human brains. Secondly, the development of advanced mathematical tools in network science and graph theory, which has recently translated into modeling the human brain as a network, giving rise to the area of research so called Brain Connectivity or Connectomics. In brain network models, nodes correspond to gray-matter regions (based on functional or structural, atlas-based parcellations that constitute a partition), while links or edges correspond either to structural connections as modeled based on white matter fiber-tracts or to the functional coupling between brain regions by computing statistical dependencies between measured brain activity from different nodes. Indeed, the network approach for studying the brain has several advantages: 1) it eases the study of collective behaviors and interactions between regions; 2) allows to map and study quantitative properties of its anatomical pathways; 3) gives measures to quantify integration and segregation of information processes in the brain, and the flow (i.e. the interacting dynamics) between different cortical and sub-cortical regions. The main contribution of my PhD work was indeed to develop and implement new models and methods for brain connectivity assessment in the human brain, having as primary application the analysis of neuroimaging data coming from subjects at different levels of consciousness. I have here applied these methods to investigate changes in levels of consciousness, from normal wakefulness (healthy human brains) or drug-induced unconsciousness (i.e. anesthesia) to pathological (i.e. patients with disorders of consciousness).
Keywords
Brain connectivity, brain networks, consciousness

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Amico, Enrico. “Methods and Models for Brain Connectivity Assessment Across Levels of Consciousness.” 2016 : n. pag. Print.
APA
Amico, E. (2016). Methods and models for brain connectivity assessment across levels of consciousness. Université de Liège. Faculté de Médecine ; Ghent University. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Liège ; Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Amico, Enrico. 2016. “Methods and Models for Brain Connectivity Assessment Across Levels of Consciousness”. Liège ; Ghent, Belgium: Université de Liège. Faculté de Médecine ; Ghent University. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Amico, Enrico. 2016. “Methods and Models for Brain Connectivity Assessment Across Levels of Consciousness”. Liège ; Ghent, Belgium: Université de Liège. Faculté de Médecine ; Ghent University. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences.
Vancouver
1.
Amico E. Methods and models for brain connectivity assessment across levels of consciousness. [Liège ; Ghent, Belgium]: Université de Liège. Faculté de Médecine ; Ghent University. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences; 2016.
IEEE
[1]
E. Amico, “Methods and models for brain connectivity assessment across levels of consciousness,” Université de Liège. Faculté de Médecine ; Ghent University. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Liège ; Ghent, Belgium, 2016.
@phdthesis{8070168,
  abstract     = {The human brain is one of the most complex and fascinating systems in nature. In the last decades, two events have boosted the investigation of its functional and structural properties. Firstly, the emergence of novel noninvasive neuroimaging modalities, which helped improving the spatial and temporal resolution of the data collected from in vivo human brains. Secondly, the development of advanced mathematical tools in network science and graph theory, which has recently translated into modeling the human brain as a network, giving rise to the area of research so called Brain Connectivity or Connectomics.
In brain network models, nodes correspond to gray-matter regions (based on functional or structural, atlas-based parcellations that constitute a partition), while links or edges correspond either to structural connections as modeled based on white matter fiber-tracts or to the functional coupling between brain regions by computing statistical dependencies between measured brain activity from different nodes.
Indeed, the network approach for studying the brain has several advantages:
1) it eases the study of collective behaviors and interactions between regions;
2) allows to map and study quantitative properties of its anatomical pathways;
3) gives measures to quantify integration and segregation of information processes in the brain, and the flow (i.e. the interacting dynamics) between different cortical and sub-cortical regions.
The main contribution of my PhD work was indeed to develop and implement new models and methods for brain connectivity assessment in the human brain, having as primary application the analysis of neuroimaging data coming from subjects at different levels of consciousness. I have here applied these methods to investigate changes in levels of consciousness, from normal wakefulness (healthy human brains) or drug-induced unconsciousness (i.e. anesthesia) to pathological (i.e. patients with disorders of consciousness).},
  author       = {Amico, Enrico},
  keywords     = {Brain connectivity,brain networks,consciousness},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {II, 186},
  publisher    = {Université de Liège. Faculté de Médecine ; Ghent University. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Methods and models for brain connectivity assessment across levels of consciousness},
  year         = {2016},
}