Advanced search
1 file | 1.31 MB Add to list

Neural activations at the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus: interindividual variability, reliability, and association with sulcal morphology

(2009) HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING. 30(1). p.299-311
Author
Organization
Abstract
The sulcal morphology of the human frontal lobe is highly variable. Although the structural images usually acquired in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies provide information about this interindividual variability, this information is only rarely used to relate structure and function. Here, we investigated the spatial relationship between posterior frontolateral activations in a task-switching paradigm and the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus (inferior frontal junction, IFJ) on an individual-subject basis. Results show that, although variable in terms of stereotaxic coordinates, the posterior frontolateral activations observed in task-switching are consistently and reliably located at the TFJ in the brains of individual participants. The IFJ shares such consistent localization with other nonprimary areas as motion-sensitive area V5/MT and the frontal eye field. Building on tension-based models of morphogenesis, this structure-function correspondence might indicate that the cytoarchitectonic area underlying activations of the IFJ develops at early stages of cortical folding.
Keywords
Computer-Assisted/methods Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods Male Mental Processes/physiology Nerve Fibers, Myelinated/physiology/ultrastructure Neuropsychological Tests Phenotype Psychomotor Performance/*physiology Reproducibility of Results Young Adult, Adult Brain Mapping/methods Cognition/*physiology Female Frontal Lobe/*embryology/*growth & development Functional Laterality/physiology Genetic Variation/physiology Humans Image Processing

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.31 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Derrfuss, Jan et al. “Neural Activations at the Junction of the Inferior Frontal Sulcus and the Inferior Precentral Sulcus: Interindividual Variability, Reliability, and Association with Sulcal Morphology.” HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING 30.1 (2009): 299–311. Print.
APA
Derrfuss, J., Brass, M., von Cramon, D. Y., Lohmann, G., & Amunts, K. (2009). Neural activations at the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus: interindividual variability, reliability, and association with sulcal morphology. HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING, 30(1), 299–311.
Chicago author-date
Derrfuss, Jan, Marcel Brass, D. Yves von Cramon, Gabriele Lohmann, and Katrin Amunts. 2009. “Neural Activations at the Junction of the Inferior Frontal Sulcus and the Inferior Precentral Sulcus: Interindividual Variability, Reliability, and Association with Sulcal Morphology.” Human Brain Mapping 30 (1): 299–311.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Derrfuss, Jan, Marcel Brass, D. Yves von Cramon, Gabriele Lohmann, and Katrin Amunts. 2009. “Neural Activations at the Junction of the Inferior Frontal Sulcus and the Inferior Precentral Sulcus: Interindividual Variability, Reliability, and Association with Sulcal Morphology.” Human Brain Mapping 30 (1): 299–311.
Vancouver
1.
Derrfuss J, Brass M, von Cramon DY, Lohmann G, Amunts K. Neural activations at the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus: interindividual variability, reliability, and association with sulcal morphology. HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING. 2009;30(1):299–311.
IEEE
[1]
J. Derrfuss, M. Brass, D. Y. von Cramon, G. Lohmann, and K. Amunts, “Neural activations at the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus: interindividual variability, reliability, and association with sulcal morphology,” HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 299–311, 2009.
@article{806890,
  abstract     = {The sulcal morphology of the human frontal lobe is highly variable. Although the structural images usually acquired in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies provide information about this interindividual variability, this information is only rarely used to relate structure and function. Here, we investigated the spatial relationship between posterior frontolateral activations in a task-switching paradigm and the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus (inferior frontal junction, IFJ) on an individual-subject basis. Results show that, although variable in terms of stereotaxic coordinates, the posterior frontolateral activations observed in task-switching are consistently and reliably located at the TFJ in the brains of individual participants. The IFJ shares such consistent localization with other nonprimary areas as motion-sensitive area V5/MT and the frontal eye field. Building on tension-based models of morphogenesis, this structure-function correspondence might indicate that the cytoarchitectonic area underlying activations of the IFJ develops at early stages of cortical folding.},
  author       = {Derrfuss, Jan and Brass, Marcel and von Cramon, D. Yves and Lohmann, Gabriele and Amunts, Katrin},
  issn         = {1065-9471},
  journal      = {HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING},
  keywords     = {Computer-Assisted/methods Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods Male Mental Processes/physiology Nerve Fibers,Myelinated/physiology/ultrastructure Neuropsychological Tests Phenotype Psychomotor Performance/*physiology Reproducibility of Results Young Adult,Adult Brain Mapping/methods Cognition/*physiology Female Frontal Lobe/*embryology/*growth & development Functional Laterality/physiology Genetic Variation/physiology Humans Image Processing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {299--311},
  title        = {Neural activations at the junction of the inferior frontal sulcus and the inferior precentral sulcus: interindividual variability, reliability, and association with sulcal morphology},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.20501},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2009},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: