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Two newly discovered Grateloupia (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) species on aquaculture rafts on the west coast of South Africa, including the widely introduced Grateloupia turuturu

John J Bolton, Olivier De Clerck UGent, Caitlynne M Francis, Fridah Siyanga-Tembo and Robert J Anderson (2016) PHYCOLOGIA. 55(6). p.659-664
abstract
Compared with other world regions, very few species of marine macroalgae have been demonstrated to be recent introductions into South Africa. Collections of red seaweeds growing on ropes on an oyster farm in Saldanha Bay on the west coast of South Africa included two species of Grateloupia. The most abundant one is foliose, and has identical rbcL and cox1 sequences to that of Grateloupia turuturu, indigenous to Japan/Korea but introduced into many world regions. The other species is finely branched and presumably also an introduction, being closest in rbcL sequence to G. carnosa from Japan but not identical. Our findings highlight the continuous risk imposed by the translocation of oysters for mariculture purposes to spread and introduce non-native and potentially invasive species worldwide. In addition, our inability to identify the second species, despite its sister relationship to a species from the Western Pacific Ocean, calls for the establishment of a reference DNA-barcode library of seaweeds from the temperate Western Pacific Ocean to facilitate the early detection of introduced and potentially invasive seaweeds. South Africa now has three foliose and two filamentous species of Grateloupia sensu lato. Although the newly introduced species have not been recorded outside the Saldanha Bay area so far, continuous monitoring is advised to document the future spread of the species and their effects on native coastal ecosystems.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
cox1, Halymeniaceae, Invasive species, Marine macroalgae, Oyster farming, rbcL, Saldanha Bay, AUXILIARY-CELL AMPULLAE, IBERIAN PENINSULA, SEQUENCE-ANALYSIS, 1ST RECORD, SP-NOV, SEAWEED, REASSESSMENT, DORYPHORA, GIGARTINALES, ASSEMBLAGES
journal title
PHYCOLOGIA
Phycologia
volume
55
issue
6
pages
659 - 664
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000390263000005
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.826 (2016)
JCR rank
76/211 (2016)
JCR quartile
2 (2016)
ISSN
0031-8884
DOI
10.2216/15-104.1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8068560
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8068560
date created
2016-09-08 09:10:19
date last changed
2017-06-13 12:21:09
@article{8068560,
  abstract     = {Compared with other world regions, very few species of marine macroalgae have been demonstrated to be recent introductions into South Africa. Collections of red seaweeds growing on ropes on an oyster farm in Saldanha Bay on the west coast of South Africa included two species of Grateloupia. The most abundant one is foliose, and has identical rbcL and cox1 sequences to that of Grateloupia turuturu, indigenous to Japan/Korea but introduced into many world regions. The other species is finely branched and presumably also an introduction, being closest in rbcL sequence to G. carnosa from Japan but not identical. Our findings highlight the continuous risk imposed by the translocation of oysters for mariculture purposes to spread and introduce non-native and potentially invasive species worldwide. In addition, our inability to identify the second species, despite its sister relationship to a species from the Western Pacific Ocean, calls for the establishment of a reference DNA-barcode library of seaweeds from the temperate Western Pacific Ocean to facilitate the early detection of introduced and potentially invasive seaweeds. South Africa now has three foliose and two filamentous species of Grateloupia sensu lato. Although the newly introduced species have not been recorded outside the Saldanha Bay area so far, continuous monitoring is advised to document the future spread of the species and their effects on native coastal ecosystems.},
  author       = {Bolton, John J and De Clerck, Olivier and Francis, Caitlynne M and Siyanga-Tembo, Fridah and Anderson, Robert J},
  issn         = {0031-8884},
  journal      = {PHYCOLOGIA},
  keyword      = {cox1,Halymeniaceae,Invasive species,Marine macroalgae,Oyster farming,rbcL,Saldanha Bay,AUXILIARY-CELL AMPULLAE,IBERIAN PENINSULA,SEQUENCE-ANALYSIS,1ST RECORD,SP-NOV,SEAWEED,REASSESSMENT,DORYPHORA,GIGARTINALES,ASSEMBLAGES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {659--664},
  title        = {Two newly discovered Grateloupia (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) species on aquaculture rafts on the west coast of South Africa, including the widely introduced Grateloupia turuturu},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2216/15-104.1},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Bolton, John J, Olivier De Clerck, Caitlynne M Francis, Fridah Siyanga-Tembo, and Robert J Anderson. 2016. “Two Newly Discovered Grateloupia (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) Species on Aquaculture Rafts on the West Coast of South Africa, Including the Widely Introduced Grateloupia Turuturu.” Phycologia 55 (6): 659–664.
APA
Bolton, J. J., De Clerck, O., Francis, C. M., Siyanga-Tembo, F., & Anderson, R. J. (2016). Two newly discovered Grateloupia (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) species on aquaculture rafts on the west coast of South Africa, including the widely introduced Grateloupia turuturu. PHYCOLOGIA, 55(6), 659–664.
Vancouver
1.
Bolton JJ, De Clerck O, Francis CM, Siyanga-Tembo F, Anderson RJ. Two newly discovered Grateloupia (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) species on aquaculture rafts on the west coast of South Africa, including the widely introduced Grateloupia turuturu. PHYCOLOGIA. 2016;55(6):659–64.
MLA
Bolton, John J, Olivier De Clerck, Caitlynne M Francis, et al. “Two Newly Discovered Grateloupia (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) Species on Aquaculture Rafts on the West Coast of South Africa, Including the Widely Introduced Grateloupia Turuturu.” PHYCOLOGIA 55.6 (2016): 659–664. Print.