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Association between tobacco control policies and smoking behaviour among adolescents in 29 European countries

Anne Hublet UGent, H Schmid, Els Clays UGent, E Godeau, SN Gabhainn, L Joossens and Lea Maes UGent (2009) ADDICTION. 104(11). p.1918-1926
abstract
Aims To investigate the associations between well-known, cost-effective tobacco control policies at country level and smoking prevalence among 15-year-old adolescents. Design Multi-level modelling based on the 2005-06 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study, a cross-national study at individual level, and with country-level variables from the Tobacco Control Scale and published country-level databases. Setting Twenty-nine European countries. Participants A total of 25 599 boys and 26 509 girls. Main outcome measures Self-reported regular smoking defined as at least weekly smoking, including daily smoking (dichotomous). Findings Interaction effects between gender and smoking policies were identified, therefore boys and girls were analysed separately. Large cross-national differences in smoking prevalence were documented. Intraclass correlations (ICC) of 0.038 (boys) and 0.035 (girls) were found. In the final multi-level model for boys, besides the significance of the individual variables such as family affluence, country-level affluence and the legality of vending machines were related significantly to regular smoking [b(country affluence) = -0.010; b(partial restriction vending machines) = -0.366, P < 0.05]. Price policy was of borderline significance [b(price policy) = -0.026, P = 0.050]. All relationships were in the expected direction. The model fit is not as good for girls; only the legality of vending machines had a borderline significance in the final model [b(total ban vending machines) = -0.372, P = 0.06]. Conclusions For boys, some of the currently recommended tobacco control policies may help to reduce smoking prevalence. However, the model is less suitable for girls, indicating gender differences in the potential efficacy of smoking policies. Future research should address this issue.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
ADDICTION
volume
104
issue
11
pages
1918 - 1926
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000270638300023
JCR category
SUBSTANCE ABUSE
JCR impact factor
3.842 (2009)
JCR rank
1/22 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
0965-2140
DOI
10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02686.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
806286
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-806286
date created
2009-12-10 10:51:59
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:19:14
@article{806286,
  abstract     = {Aims

To investigate the associations between well-known, cost-effective tobacco control policies at country level and smoking prevalence among 15-year-old adolescents.

Design

Multi-level modelling based on the 2005-06 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study, a cross-national study at individual level, and with country-level variables from the Tobacco Control Scale and published country-level databases.

Setting

Twenty-nine European countries.

Participants

A total of 25 599 boys and 26 509 girls.

Main outcome measures

Self-reported regular smoking defined as at least weekly smoking, including daily smoking (dichotomous).

Findings

Interaction effects between gender and smoking policies were identified, therefore boys and girls were analysed separately. Large cross-national differences in smoking prevalence were documented. Intraclass correlations (ICC) of 0.038 (boys) and 0.035 (girls) were found. In the final multi-level model for boys, besides the significance of the individual variables such as family affluence, country-level affluence and the legality of vending machines were related significantly to regular smoking [b(country affluence) = -0.010; b(partial restriction vending machines) = -0.366, P {\textlangle} 0.05]. Price policy was of borderline significance [b(price policy) = -0.026, P = 0.050]. All relationships were in the expected direction. The model fit is not as good for girls; only the legality of vending machines had a borderline significance in the final model [b(total ban vending machines) = -0.372, P = 0.06].

Conclusions

For boys, some of the currently recommended tobacco control policies may help to reduce smoking prevalence. However, the model is less suitable for girls, indicating gender differences in the potential efficacy of smoking policies. Future research should address this issue.},
  author       = {Hublet, Anne and Schmid, H and Clays, Els and Godeau, E and Gabhainn, SN and Joossens, L and Maes, Lea},
  issn         = {0965-2140},
  journal      = {ADDICTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1918--1926},
  title        = {Association between tobacco control policies and smoking behaviour among adolescents in 29 European countries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02686.x},
  volume       = {104},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Hublet, Anne, H Schmid, Els Clays, E Godeau, SN Gabhainn, L Joossens, and Lea Maes. 2009. “Association Between Tobacco Control Policies and Smoking Behaviour Among Adolescents in 29 European Countries.” Addiction 104 (11): 1918–1926.
APA
Hublet, A., Schmid, H., Clays, E., Godeau, E., Gabhainn, S., Joossens, L., & Maes, L. (2009). Association between tobacco control policies and smoking behaviour among adolescents in 29 European countries. ADDICTION, 104(11), 1918–1926.
Vancouver
1.
Hublet A, Schmid H, Clays E, Godeau E, Gabhainn S, Joossens L, et al. Association between tobacco control policies and smoking behaviour among adolescents in 29 European countries. ADDICTION. 2009;104(11):1918–26.
MLA
Hublet, Anne, H Schmid, Els Clays, et al. “Association Between Tobacco Control Policies and Smoking Behaviour Among Adolescents in 29 European Countries.” ADDICTION 104.11 (2009): 1918–1926. Print.