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Ethnic minority households and residential segregation: how important is the household composition to understand where minorities live?

Ad Coenen UGent, Pieter-Paul Verhaeghe UGent and Bart Van de Putte UGent (2016) European Population Conference.
abstract
Despite the importance of life cycle and household characteristics for residential mobility, these factors are seldom considered in the extensive field of ethnic residential segregation research. This study integrates the household composition of ethnic minorities into the spatial assimilation theory, the ethnic enclave theory and the self-segregation theory. We investigate the relationship between the type of household and living in a concentration neighbourhood for Turkish and North-African origin households. Moreover, we distinguish between both higher-educated and lower-educated people. For these purposes, we use a selection of the Belgian census data of 2011 (N=126,451). We used multilevel binary logistic regression analyses comparing families with children, childless couples and single and living alone households. We find clear associations between living in a Turkish of North-African concentration neighbourhood and the household type: families with children are more likely to live in concentration neighbourhoods than childless couples. Moreover, only lower educated families with children are more likely to live in concentration neighbourhoods than lower educated singles. Higher educated families are equally likely to live in a non-concentration neighbourhood as higher educated single and living alone households.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
European Population Conference
conference name
European Population Conference
conference location
Mainz
conference start
2016-08-31
conference end
2016-09-03
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
8060033
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8060033
date created
2016-09-05 09:15:17
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:36:38
@inproceedings{8060033,
  abstract     = {Despite the importance of life cycle and household characteristics for residential mobility, these factors are seldom considered in the extensive field of ethnic residential segregation research. This study integrates the household composition of ethnic minorities into the spatial assimilation theory, the ethnic enclave theory and the self-segregation theory. We investigate the relationship between the type of household and living in a concentration neighbourhood for Turkish and North-African origin households. Moreover, we distinguish between both higher-educated and lower-educated people. For these purposes, we use a selection of the Belgian census data of 2011 (N=126,451). We used multilevel binary logistic regression analyses comparing families with children, childless couples and single and living alone households. We find clear associations between living in a Turkish of North-African concentration neighbourhood and the household type: families with children are more likely to live in concentration neighbourhoods than childless couples. Moreover, only lower educated families with children are more likely to live in concentration neighbourhoods than lower educated singles. Higher educated families are equally likely to live in a non-concentration neighbourhood as higher educated single and living alone households.},
  author       = {Coenen, Ad and Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul and Van de Putte, Bart},
  booktitle    = {European Population Conference},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Mainz},
  title        = {Ethnic minority households and residential segregation: how important is the household composition to understand where minorities live?},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Coenen, Ad, Pieter-Paul Verhaeghe, and Bart Van de Putte. 2016. “Ethnic Minority Households and Residential Segregation: How Important Is the Household Composition to Understand Where Minorities Live?” In European Population Conference.
APA
Coenen, A., Verhaeghe, P.-P., & Van de Putte, B. (2016). Ethnic minority households and residential segregation: how important is the household composition to understand where minorities live? European Population Conference. Presented at the European Population Conference.
Vancouver
1.
Coenen A, Verhaeghe P-P, Van de Putte B. Ethnic minority households and residential segregation: how important is the household composition to understand where minorities live? European Population Conference. 2016.
MLA
Coenen, Ad, Pieter-Paul Verhaeghe, and Bart Van de Putte. “Ethnic Minority Households and Residential Segregation: How Important Is the Household Composition to Understand Where Minorities Live?” European Population Conference. 2016. Print.