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Society, the market, or actually both? Networks and the allocation of credit and capital goods in the Roman economy

Andries Zuiderhoek (UGent) and Wim Broekaert (UGent)
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Abstract
In the Roman world, the bulk of both agrarian and non-agrarian production and distribution took place at the local urban and the regional level, to satisfy local and regional demand. In a large territorial empire with, by pre-industrial standards, unusually high levels of urbanisation (particularly in its core areas) this implied productive local and regional agricultural economies and burgeoning, highly diversified urban manufacturing, service and commercial sectors, even in smaller cities. The demand that could not be met locally or regionally, moreover, was catered for through an intricate web of interregional commerce. This paper starts from a simple question: how did those myriad individuals intending to produce and distribute goods and services in and around Roman cities and in and between regions and provinces gain access to credit (investment capital) and necessary capital goods?
Keywords
Capital Markets, and Roman urban crafts, Roman Trade Networks, Ancient Roman economy, trade and commerce, Roman Economy

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MLA
Zuiderhoek, Andries, and Wim Broekaert. “Society, the Market, or Actually Both? Networks and the Allocation of Credit and Capital Goods in the Roman Economy.” CAHIERS DU CENTRE GUSTAVE GLOTZ 26 (2015): 141–190. Print.
APA
Zuiderhoek, A., & Broekaert, W. (2015). Society, the market, or actually both? Networks and the allocation of credit and capital goods in the Roman economy. CAHIERS DU CENTRE GUSTAVE GLOTZ, 26, 141–190.
Chicago author-date
Zuiderhoek, Andries, and Wim Broekaert. 2015. “Society, the Market, or Actually Both? Networks and the Allocation of Credit and Capital Goods in the Roman Economy.” Cahiers Du Centre Gustave Glotz 26: 141–190.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Zuiderhoek, Andries, and Wim Broekaert. 2015. “Society, the Market, or Actually Both? Networks and the Allocation of Credit and Capital Goods in the Roman Economy.” Cahiers Du Centre Gustave Glotz 26: 141–190.
Vancouver
1.
Zuiderhoek A, Broekaert W. Society, the market, or actually both? Networks and the allocation of credit and capital goods in the Roman economy. CAHIERS DU CENTRE GUSTAVE GLOTZ. 2015;26:141–90.
IEEE
[1]
A. Zuiderhoek and W. Broekaert, “Society, the market, or actually both? Networks and the allocation of credit and capital goods in the Roman economy,” CAHIERS DU CENTRE GUSTAVE GLOTZ, vol. 26, pp. 141–190, 2015.
@article{8058797,
  abstract     = {In the Roman world, the bulk of both agrarian and non-agrarian production and distribution took place at the local urban and the regional level, to satisfy local and regional demand. In a large territorial empire with, by pre-industrial standards, unusually high levels of urbanisation (particularly in its core areas) this implied productive local and regional agricultural economies and burgeoning, highly diversified urban manufacturing, service and commercial sectors, even in smaller cities.  The demand that could not be met locally or regionally, moreover, was catered for through an intricate web of interregional commerce. This paper starts from a simple question: how did those myriad individuals intending to produce and distribute goods and services in and around Roman cities and in and between regions and provinces gain access to credit (investment capital) and necessary capital goods?},
  author       = {Zuiderhoek, Andries and Broekaert, Wim},
  issn         = {1016-9008},
  journal      = {CAHIERS DU CENTRE GUSTAVE GLOTZ},
  keywords     = {Capital Markets,and Roman urban crafts,Roman Trade Networks,Ancient Roman economy,trade and commerce,Roman Economy},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {141--190},
  title        = {Society, the market, or actually both? Networks and the allocation of credit and capital goods in the Roman economy},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2015},
}